Mandalit del Barco As an arts correspondent based at NPR West, Mandalit del Barco reports and produces stories about film, television, music, visual arts, dance and other topics.
Mandalit del Barco (square - 2015)
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Mandalit del Barco

Allison Shelley/NPR
Mandalit del Barco at NPR West in Culver City, California, September 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Mandalit del Barco

Correspondent, Arts Desk, NPR West

As an arts correspondent based at NPR West, Mandalit del Barco reports and produces stories about film, television, music, visual arts, dance and other topics. Over the years, she has also covered everything from street gangs to Hollywood, police and prisons, marijuana, immigration, race relations, natural disasters, Latino arts and urban street culture (including hip hop dance, music, and art). Every year, she covers the Oscars and the Grammy awards for NPR, as well as the Sundance Film Festival and other events. Her news reports, feature stories and photos, filed from Los Angeles and abroad, can be heard on All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, Alt.latino, and npr.org.

del Barco's reporting has taken her throughout the United States, including Los Angeles, New Orleans, New York, San Francisco and Miami. Reporting further afield as well, del Barco traveled to Haiti to report on the aftermath of the devastating earthquake. She has chronicled street gangs exported from the U.S. to El Salvador and Honduras, and in Mexico, she reported about immigrant smugglers, musicians, filmmakers and artists. In Argentina, del Barco profiled tango legend Carlos Gardel, and in the Philippines, she reported a feature on balikbayan boxes. From China, del Barco contributed to NPR's coverage of the United Nations' Women's Conference. She also spent a year in her birthplace, Peru, working on a documentary and teaching radio journalism as a Fulbright Fellow and on a fellowship with the Knight International Center For Journalists.

In addition to reporting daily stories, del Barco produced half-hour radio documentaries about gangs in Central America, Latino hip hop, L.A. Homegirls, artist Frida Kahlo, New York's Palladium ballroom and Puerto Rican "Casitas."

Before moving to Los Angeles, del Barco was a reporter for NPR Member station WNYC in New York City. She started her radio career on the production staff of NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday with Scott Simon. However her first taste for radio came as a teenager, when she and her brother won an award for an NPR children's radio contest.

del Barco's reporting experience extends into newspaper and magazines. She served on the staffs of The Miami Herald and The Village Voice, and has done freelance reporting. She has written articles for Latina magazine and reported for the weekly radio show Latino USA.

Stories written by del Barco have appeared in several books including Las Christmas: Favorite Latino Authors Share their Holiday Memories (Vintage Books) and Las Mamis: Favorite Latino Authors Remember their Mothers (Vintage Books). del Barco contributed to an anthology on rap music and hip hop culture in the book, Droppin' Science (Temple University Press).

Peruvian writer Julio Villanueva Chang profiled del Barco's life and career for the book Se Habla Espanol: Voces Latinas en USA (Alfaguara Press).

She mentors young journalists through NPR's "Next Generation", Global Girl, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and on her own, throughout the U.S. and Latin America.

A fourth generation journalist, del Barco was born in Lima, Peru, to a Peruvian father and Mexican-American mother. She grew up in Baldwin, Kansas, and in Oakland, California, and has lived in Manhattan, Madrid, Miami, Lima and Los Angeles. She began her journalism career as a reporter, columnist and editor for the Daily Californian while studying anthropology and rhetoric at the University of California, Berkeley. She earned a Master's degree in journalism from Columbia University with her thesis, "Breakdancers: Who are they, and why are they spinning on their heads?"

For those who are curious where her name comes from, "Mandalit" is the name of a woman in a song from Carmina Burana, a musical work from the 13th century put to music in the 20th century by composer Carl Orff.

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

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Justin Lansing (left) and Joe Mailander of the Okee Dokee Brothers have declined their 2021 Grammy Award nomination for best children's album. The duo won the honor in 2013 for their album Can You Canoe? and have amassed five total nominations. Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

3 Grammy Contenders Share Outrage At All-White Category, Decline Nominations

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In 'Soul,' Jon Batiste's Music Helps Bring Pixar's First Black Lead To Life

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José Feliciano's bilingual Christmas song, "Feliz Navidad," celebrates 50 years. TK hide caption

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TK

50 Years Later, 'Feliz Navidad' Still Delivers On Its Bilingual Message

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Latinx KidLit Book Festival

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Argentinean singer-songwriter Suni Paz has been selected for the 2020 class of NEA Heritage Fellows. Ramiro Fauve/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ramiro Fauve/Courtesy of the artist

NEA Heritage Fellow Suni Paz Sings For Children And The Have-Nots

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Silvia Calderoni stars in Ouverture Of Something That Never Ended, a seven-part film collaboration between award-winning director Gus Van Sant and Gucci creative director Alessandro Michele. GUCCI/YouTube hide caption

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What Is The End Of An Era? 'Jeopardy!' Host Alex Trebek Dies At 80

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Altarista Ofelia Esparza says it's been "a nightmare year" of loss for her family. Above, framed photographs of loved ones lost at her community altar in Grand Park. Beau Ryan hide caption

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Beau Ryan

LA Latinos Mark El Día De Los Muertos In 'A Nightmare Year' Of Loss

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Linda Ronstadt in the new film, Linda and the Mockingbirds. PCH Films hide caption

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PCH Films

Latinidad In The News

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Documentary On HBO Provides A Look Into The Miranda Family

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