Debbie Elliott NPR National Correspondent Debbie Elliott can be heard telling stories from her native South and occasionally guest-hosting NPR news programs.
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Debbie Elliott

Rosa Parks, whose refusal to give up her seat touched off the Montgomery bus boycott and the beginning of the civil rights movement, is fingerprinted by police Lt. D.H. Lackey in Montgomery, Ala., Feb. 22, 1956, when she was among several others charged with violating segregation laws. Gene Herrick/AP hide caption

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Gene Herrick/AP

In Montgomery, Rosa Parks' Story Offers A History Lesson For Police

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Supporters of Louisiana Gov.-elect John Bel Edwards celebrate his win. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Louisiana Democrat Governor Victory Disrupts Partisan Politics Tradition

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Louisiana's Bitter Gubernatorial Race Enters Its Final Week

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Riders stand in a crowded bus in Montgomery, Ala. Sixty years after the historic Montgomery bus boycott, many of the city's residents say the system doesn't work for them. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

60 Years After The Boycott, Progress Stalls For Montgomery Buses

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Louisiana voters re-elected David Vitter after he apologized for being involved in a Washington prostitution scandal. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

David Vitter, Running For Governor, Accused Of Being 'Wrong On Fornication'

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Civil rights activist Myrlie Evers-Williams speaks during the memorial service for the late civil rights leader Julian Bond, who succeeded her as leader of the NAACP, on Tuesday at the Lincoln Theater in Washington. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Civil Rights Luminaries Remember Julian Bond As A Dogged Advocate

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The courtroom in Sumner, Miss., where, in 1955, an all-white jury acquitted two white men in the murder of Emmett Till, a 14-year old black boy. Langdon Clay hide caption

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Langdon Clay

6 Decades Later, Acquittal Of Emmett Till's Killers Troubles Town

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump drew an estimated 30,000 people to a rally in Mobile, Ala., last month. He's one of several Republican candidates visiting the South — especially states like Alabama with early primaries. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

The South Rises In Influence To Pick Republican Nominee

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Hunting Dogs Can Spend Eternity At The Coon Dog Cemetery

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On Eve Of Katrina Anniversary, Bush Takes A Tour Of New Orleans 10 Years On

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Decade After Hurricane Katrina, Obama Celebrates New Orleans' Resilience

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Lower Ninth Ward Residents Remember When The Levees Failed New Orleans

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Angela Chalk looks at a home in New Orleans' 7th Ward that hasn't been touched since Hurricane Katrina. Chalk, the vice president of the 7th Ward neighborhood association, spends some of her free time tracking down and reporting dilapidated and abandoned properties. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

New Orleans Neighborhoods Scrabble For Hope In Abandoned Ruins

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