Debbie Elliott NPR National Correspondent Debbie Elliott can be heard telling stories from her native South and occasionally guest-hosting NPR news programs.
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Debbie Elliott

A Baton Rouge police officer kneels at the casket of Cpl. Montrell Jackson, one of three officers ambushed and killed by a gunman July 17, 2016. Patrick Dennis/AP hide caption

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Patrick Dennis/AP

In March, State Attorney Aramis Ayala announced she wouldn't seek the death penalty in murder cases. Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images

In this June 18, 2015, photo, a prisoner walks near his crowded living area in Elmore Correctional Facility in Elmore, Ala. Tuesday's ruling comes in a class action lawsuit brought by inmates who argued the conditions violated the U.S. Constitution's ban on cruel and unusual punishment. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

The Zirlott family's oyster farm is at the end of a long pier in Sandy Bay. Legend has it that the name "Murder Point" comes from a deadly dispute over an oyster lease at this site back in 1929. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

7 Years After BP Oil Spill, Oyster Farming Takes Hold In South

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Orange-Osceola State Attorney Aramis Ayala speaks with reporters about her decision to not pursue the death penalty during her administration. Renata Sago/WMFE hide caption

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Renata Sago/WMFE

Cases Pulled For Refusing The Death Penalty; Attorney Sues To Get Them Back

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Anders Osborne at his home studio. The New Orleans bluesman is launching a program to help musicians and others in the industry stay sober in a work environment where that can be difficult. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

'Send Me A Friend': Anders Osborne Helps Musicians Stay Sober On Tour

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Republican Kay Ivey Takes Oath As Alabama's New Governor

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Ala. Gov. Bentley Agrees To Plea Deal And Resigns Amid Scandal

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Alabama Governor Resigns Over Alleged Affair And Cover-Up

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Alabama Governor Refuses To Step Down, Faces Impeachment Hearings

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Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley gives the annual State of the State address in February. A judge today delayed the start of impeachment proceedings against the governor. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

While facing a number of issues surrounding lethal injection as a execution method, some states like Mississippi are creating back-up plans of alternative methods. These methods include using a gas chamber, an electric chair or a firing squad to carry out executions. Nevada Department of Corrections via AP hide caption

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Nevada Department of Corrections via AP

States Find Other Execution Methods After Difficulties With Lethal Injection

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Orange County State Attorney Aramis Ayala announced last month that she would no longer seek the death penalty in Orange and Osceola counties. On Monday, Florida Gov. Rick Scott reassigned 22 murder cases from Ayala. Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images