Debbie Elliott NPR National Correspondent Debbie Elliott can be heard telling stories from her native South.
Debbie Elliot
Stories By

Debbie Elliott

Christine Uter
Debbie Elliot
Christine Uter

Debbie Elliott

Correspondent, National Desk

NPR National Correspondent Debbie Elliott can be heard telling stories from her native South. She covers the latest news and politics, and is attuned to the region's rich culture and history.

For more than two decades, Elliott has been one of NPR's top breaking news reporters. She's covered dozens of natural disasters – including hurricanes Andrew, Katrina and Harvey. She reported on the aftermath of the 2010 Haiti earthquake, introducing NPR listeners to teenage boys orphaned in the disaster, struggling to survive on their own.

Elliott spent months covering the nation's worst man-made environmental disaster, the 2010 BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, documenting its lingering impact on Gulf coast communities and the complex legal battles that ensued. She launched the series "The Disappearing Coast," which examines the oil spill's lasting imprint on a fragile coastline.

She was honored with a 2018 Gracie Award from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation for crisis coverage, in part for her work covering the deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and the mass murder of worshippers at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. She was part of NPR's teams covering the mass shootings at Charleston's Emanuel AME Church and the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando.

Elliott has followed national debates over immigration, healthcare, abortion, tobacco, voting rights, welfare reform, same-sex marriage, Confederate monuments, criminal justice and policing in America. She examined the obesity epidemic in Mississippi, a shortage of public defenders in Louisiana, a rise in the incarceration of girls in Florida and chronic inhumane conditions at state prisons in Alabama and Mississippi.

A particular focus for Elliott has been exploring how Americans live through the prism of race, culture and history. Her coverage links lessons from the past to the movement for racial justice in America today.

She's looked at the legacy of landmark civil rights events, including the integration of Little Rock's Central High, the assassination of Mississippi NAACP leader Medgar Evers, the Montgomery bus boycott and the voting rights march in Selma, Alabama. She contributed a four-part series on the 1968 assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee, which earned a 2019 Gracie Award for documentary.

She was present for the re-opening of civil rights era murder cases, covering trials in the 16th Street Church bombing in Birmingham, the murder of Hattiesburg, Miss., NAACP leader Vernon Dahmer and the killings of three civil rights workers in Neshoba County, Miss.

Elliott has profiled key figures in politics and the arts, including former Attorney General Jeff Sessions, historian John Hope Franklin, Congressman John Lewis, children's book author Eric Carle, musician Trombone Shorty and former Louisiana Governor Edwin Edwards. She covered the funerals of the Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin, and the King of the Blues BB King, and she took listeners along for the second line jazz procession in memory of Fats Domino in New Orleans.

Her stories give a taste of southern culture, from the Nashville hot chicken craze to the traditions of Mardi Gras to the roots of American music at Mississippi's new Grammy Museum. She's highlighted little-known treasures such as North Carolina artist Freeman Vines and his hanging tree guitars, the magical House of Dance and Feathers in New Orleans' Lower 9th ward, a remote Coon Dog Cemetery in north Alabama and the Cajun Christmas tradition of lighting bonfires on the levees of the Mississippi River.

Elliott is a former host of NPR's newsmagazine All Things Considered on the weekends, and is a former Capitol Hill Correspondent. She's an occasional guest host of NPR's news programs and is a contributor to podcasts and live programming.

Elliott was born in Atlanta, grew up in the Memphis area, and is a graduate of the University of Alabama. She lives in south Alabama with her husband, two children and a pet beagle.

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Story Archive

Cleanup Is Underway On Gulf Coast After Hurricane Sally

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Hurricane Sally Hits Alabama, May Cause Catastrophic Flooding

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Hurricane Sally Makes Landfall Near Gulf Shores, Ala.

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Hurricane Warnings Are Up From Southeast Louisiana To Florida's Panhandle

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Freeman Vines and his guitars in 2015. Timothy Duffy hide caption

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Timothy Duffy

Hanging Tree Guitars: The Wood's 'Not Good, Not Bad, Not Ugly — Just Strange'

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Protesters march with the family of Jacob Blake during a rally against racism and police brutality in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on August 29, 2020. STEPHEN MATUREN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STEPHEN MATUREN/AFP via Getty Images

A Father's Fight Paved Way For Independent Investigation Into Kenosha Shooting

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It's Peak Hurricane Season. You Should Have These Plans Ready

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Former Presidents And Others Attend The Funeral For Rep. John Lewis

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Mourners Gather For For The Funeral Of Congressman John Lewis

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John Lewis, Sharecroppers' Son, Is Given A Heroes Sendoff In Alabama

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Late John Lewis' Final Trip Across The Edmund Pettus Bridge

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A fishing vessel plying the waters of Apalachicola Bay. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Florida Closes Iconic Apalachicola Oyster Fishery

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In November 2016, Congressman John Lewis viewed for the first time images and his arrest record from a March 5, 1963, nonviolent sit-in at Nashville's segregated lunch counters. Rick Diamond/Getty Images hide caption

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Civil Rights Leader John Lewis Never Gave Up Or Gave In

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Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions Loses Alabama Runoff Election

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Jeff Sessions talks with the media after voting in Alabama's primary election in Mobile, Ala., on March 3. He faces Tommy Tuberville in Tuesday's Republican Senate runoff. Vasha Hunt/AP hide caption

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Vasha Hunt/AP

Sessions Fights For His Political Life As Trump Looms Over Alabama Senate Race

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