Pam Fessler Pam Fessler is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where she covers poverty and philanthropy.
Pam Fessler at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Pam Fessler

Relief agencies like the American Red Cross say monetary donations give them the greatest flexibility to address victims' needs. Erik Lesser/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Erik Lesser/EPA/Landov

House, Senate Consider Cuts In Food Stamp Program

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TD Bank volunteers sort donated food into barrels at the Manna Food Center in Gaithersburg in Montgomery County, Md. Poverty in the county just outside Washington, D.C., has grown by two-thirds since 2007. Gabriella Demczuk/NPR hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/NPR

Advocates Struggle To Reach Growing Ranks Of Suburban Poor

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Wanda Rayborn, 63, was homeless for nine years and was living under a tree in downtown San Diego two years ago. She now lives in a newly renovated efficiency apartment — part of an initiative to help get homeless people off the streets. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

Changes Help San Diego Homeless, But Long Road Remains Ahead

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Voters line up into the night outside a Miami polling station, some waiting for hours to vote in the 2012 presidential election. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Free Tax Help Protects Low-Income Filers From Pricey Loans

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Tony Lithgow, 49, and Andrea Mayer, 51, live together on the streets of Baltimore. Researchers say the aging homeless population is due to younger baby boomers who came of age during the 1970s and '80s, when there were back-to-back recessions. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Linwood Hearne, 64, and his wife, Evelyn, 47, stand near Interstate 83 in Baltimore where they slept on and off for the past four years. Increasingly, the nation's homeless population is getting older, sicker and fraught with complex medical conditions. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

A nutrition specialist prepares a Meals on Wheels delivery in upstate New York. The national organization says the sequester could mean significant cuts in the number of meals they serve to homebound seniors. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Lines of voters wait to cast their ballots as the polls open in St. Petersburg, Fla., on Nov. 6. Edward Linsmier/Getty Images hide caption

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Edward Linsmier/Getty Images

President's New Voting Commission Greeted With Skepticism

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People wait to vote on Election Day in November at the Surfside Town Hall in Miami. David Santiago/El Nuevo Herald/AP hide caption

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David Santiago/El Nuevo Herald/AP

Nearly 44 percent of Americans don't have enough savings or other liquid assets to stay out of poverty for more than three months if they lose their income, according to the Corporation for Enterprise Development. Atanas Bezov/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Atanas Bezov/iStockphoto.com