Pam Fessler Pam Fessler is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where she covers poverty and philanthropy.
Pam Fessler at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Pam Fessler

Low-Key Election Supervisors' Meeting Takes On New Dimension

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An employee of the District of Columbia Housing Authority walks on the grounds of a public housing complex called Richardson Dwellings in Northeast Washington, D.C. The Trump administration wants to eliminate the federal fund now used to repair public housing in favor of attracting more private investment to repair and replace it. Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

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Amr Alfiky/NPR

Trump Administration Wants To Cut Funding For Public Housing Repairs

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Florida Governor Says Russia Hacked Into 2 Counties' Election Systems In 2016

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HUD Secretary Ben Carson is portraying the proposed change as a way to help low-income Americans who are in need of housing assistance. Shannon Finney/Getty Images hide caption

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Shannon Finney/Getty Images

A sign announces the acceptance of electronic benefit transfer cards at a farmers market in California. Anti-poverty groups fear that many low-income people might be pushed off programs such as food stamps under a possible change to how the government measures poverty. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Trump Administration Considering Changes That Would Redefine The Poverty Line

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An electronic voting machines that produces a paper receipt from Election Services & Software. The company is among those bidding to replace all of Georgia's voting machines but close relationships between state officials and ES&S have raised questions about the fairness of the bidding process. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Trips To Vegas And Chocolate-Covered Pretzels: Election Vendors Come Under Scrutiny

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Challenges Remain In Securing U.S. Elections By 2020

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Voting booths at a polling station in Christmas, Fla., on Election Day 2016. A Florida-based company that provides election equipment to localities was hacked by Russia during the 2016 election, the Mueller report found. Gregg Newton/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gregg Newton/AFP/Getty Images

"I voted" stickers at a polling station on the campus of the University of California, Irvine, on Nov. 6, 2018 in Irvine, Calif. California, ten other states and the District of Columbia have all implemented automatic voter registration as a way of increasing voter turnout. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson, seen here in February, spoke before the House and Senate appropriations committees Wednesday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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The Franciscan Center in Baltimore serves a hot lunch daily to those who need extra help, even if they receive food stamps. Those benefits could end for 755,000 able-bodied adults. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

More Than 750,000 Could Lose Food Stamps Under Trump Administration Proposal

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The debate over voting is a heated one, often tainted by misleading and exaggerated rhetoric. Simone Golob/Getty Images hide caption

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Simone Golob/Getty Images

Exaggerating Voting Issues May Juice A Base — But It Also 'Undermines Our Democracy'

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Voters Have To Wade Through Fraud Rhetoric To Get To The Truth

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Hispanic and black children are over-represented in child poverty totals. NPR hide caption

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Report: Child Poverty Could Be Cut In Half Over 10 Years, At A Hefty Price

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Motor vehicle departments across the country have accidentally allowed a small number of noncitizens to register to vote. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Some Noncitizens Do Wind Up Registered To Vote, But Usually Not On Purpose

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