Pam Fessler Pam Fessler is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where she covers poverty and philanthropy.
Pam Fessler at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Pam Fessler

Federal Appeals Court Throws Out North Carolina's Voter ID Law

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Federal Appeals Court Strikes Down Texas Voter ID Law

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Appeals Court Demands Changes To Texas Voter ID Law

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Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe leaves an event at the Alexandria Probation and Parole Office on May 24, 2016 in Alexandria, Virginia. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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In Virginia, A Battle To Give Former Felons The Right To Vote

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Lakisha Briggs, at her house in Norristown, Pa. Briggs, who was being abused by her boyfriend, lodged a legal challenge against her eviction for having the police called too many times to her former residence. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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For Low-Income Victims, Nuisance Laws Force Ultimatum: Silence Or Eviction

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Many Voters Frustrated With Their Party's Nominating Process

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Ohio voters at the polls in Cincinnati for the state's primary on March 15. John Sommers II/Getty Images hide caption

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Amid Long Voting Lines And Claims Of A 'Rigged System,' Does My Vote Matter?

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Researchers Find Surprising Results After Testing A New Way To Measure Poverty

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Marvin Cheatham, president of the Matthew Henson Neighborhood Association, stands in front of a row of abandoned homes in West Baltimore. He would like to see them torn down and replaced by a food market, a senior center and a health clinic — all of which the neighborhood currently lacks. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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In Baltimore, Hopes Of Turning Abandoned Properties Into Affordable Homes

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