Pam Fessler Pam Fessler is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where she covers poverty and philanthropy.
Pam Fessler at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Pam Fessler

A Transportation Security Administration employee stands at a booth to learn about a food stamp program at a food drive at Newark Liberty International Airport, on Jan. 23, 2019, in Newark, N.J. A number of new rules and actions proposed by the Trump administration could affect poor or low-income people who use government safety net programs. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julio Cortez/AP

Critics Of Trump's Public Charge Rule Say It Will Cost Americans More In The Long Run

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/751235943/751235944" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Advocates Oppose Rule That Penalizes Immigrants For Needing Benefits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/750728444/750729541" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ken Cuccinelli, the acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, speaks during a briefing at the White House on Monday. Trump administration officials announced new rules that aim to deny permanent residency to migrants who may need to use food stamps, Medicaid and other public benefits. Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images

Grigory Vodolazov's 3-year-old son peers into his family's apartment complex from their unit in Bellevue, Wash. The Vodolazov family is part of Creating Moves to Opportunity, a housing voucher experiment that uses incentives and counseling to encourage low-income families to move to what are called "high opportunity" areas. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Listen: Seattle Housing Experiment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/747610085/748207566" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A grocery store in New York City advertises that it accepts food stamps. A Trump administration proposal could result in 3 million people losing their food assistance. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Top Intelligence Boss Creates A New Role: The Election Threats Executive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/743709291/743709292" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Working Class Americans Are Finding It Increasingly Difficult To Afford Housing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/735930722/735930727" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An aerial view shows homes under construction at a housing development in Petaluma, Calif., in January. As housing prices surge around the country, Democratic presidential candidates are offering plans to address the shortage of affordable homes and apartments. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Why Democratic Presidential Contenders Are Discussing Affordable Housing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/733615931/733615932" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A voting line trails outside of a precinct on Election Day 2016 in Durham, N.C. The county's polling places were plagued by malfunctioning equipment to check in voters that day, and it was later revealed that the vendor behind that equipment had been targeted by Russian hackers. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

Low-Key Election Supervisors' Meeting Takes On New Dimension

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/726035410/726064036" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An employee of the District of Columbia Housing Authority walks on the grounds of a public housing complex called Richardson Dwellings in Northeast Washington, D.C. The Trump administration wants to eliminate the federal fund now used to repair public housing in favor of attracting more private investment to repair and replace it. Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Amr Alfiky/NPR

Trump Administration Wants To Cut Funding For Public Housing Repairs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/723231160/725610829" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript