Pam Fessler Pam Fessler is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where she covers poverty and philanthropy.
Pam Fessler at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., March 19, 2019. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Pam Fessler

Federal Government Issues Advisory On Russian Hackers' Election Interference

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/926843321/926880877" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mail-in ballots that need to be reviewed because of signature discrepancies sit in boxes at the Miami-Dade County Elections Department in Doral, Fla., on Oct. 15. Signature problems are a frequent reason that ballots are rejected, though many states allow voters to fix those problems before Election Day. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Race For A (Ballot) Cure: The Scramble To Fix Absentee-Ballot Problems

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/924705412/925407505" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Voting Rights Groups Help Americans 'Cure' Rejected Ballots

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/924648168/924648169" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman drops her ballot by mail at Broward County Supervisor Of Elections Office in Lauderhill, Fla., on Monday. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Challenges To State Voting Rules Could End Up Before The Supreme Court

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/921055025/921055026" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Voters wait in line to cast their ballot at an early voting location in Fairfax, Va., on Sept. 18. Growing tensions in the country have some election officials worried about potential violence at polling places. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Democrats Worry GOP Efforts To Recruit Poll Watchers May Lead To Voter Intimidation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/918317570/918317571" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Andrea Lerner (left), and her husband, Ira Lerner, sift through the mail-in applications at the Voter Registration office in the Lehigh County Government Center in Allentown, Pa. Hannah Yoon for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Hannah Yoon for NPR

'We're Rolling With It': Election Workers Scramble To Adjust To Changing Voting Rules

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/913968659/914281598" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

North Carolina Becomes 1st State To Send Out Mail-In Ballots For November Election

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/909793697/909793698" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers prepare absentee ballots for mailing Thursday at the Wake County Board of Elections in Raleigh. Other states will soon follow North Carolina in sending out ballots as the general election voting season gets underway. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gerry Broome/AP

Ballots are stored at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus, Ohio, on April 28, the final day of that state's primary election. An NPR analysis finds that more than 500,000 absentee ballots were rejected in primaries this year. Matthew Hatcher/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Matthew Hatcher/Getty Images

More Than 550,000 Primary Absentee Ballots Rejected In 2020, Far Outpacing 2016

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/904693468/905015318" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With voting by mail set for a major expansion because of the pandemic, some worry that thousands of absentee ballots could be rejected because the Postal Service may not postmark the envelope. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

States Mull Rule Changes To Make Sure Mail-In Ballots Are Counted

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/903433790/903433791" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript