Pam Fessler Pam Fessler is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where she covers poverty and philanthropy.
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Pam Fessler 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Pam Fessler

Correspondent, National Desk

Pam Fessler is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where she covers poverty and philanthropy.

In her reporting, Fessler covers homelessness, hunger, and the impact of the recession on the nation's less fortunate. She reports on non-profit groups, how they're trying to address poverty and other social issues, and how they've been affected by the economic downturn. Her poverty reporting was recognized by a 2011 First Place Headliner Award in the human interest category.

Previously, Fessler reported primarily on homeland security, including security at U.S. ports, airlines, and borders. She has also reported on the government's response to Hurricane Katrina, the 9/11 Commission investigation, and such issues as Social Security and election reform. Fessler was also one of NPR's White House reporters during the Clinton and Bush administrations.

Before becoming a correspondent, Fessler was the acting senior editor on the Washington Desk and oversaw the network's coverage of the impeachment of President Clinton and the 1998 mid-term elections. She was NPR's chief election editor in 1996, and coordinated all network coverage of the presidential, congressional, and state elections. Prior to that role, Fessler was the deputy Washington editor and Midwest National Desk editor.

Before coming to NPR in 1993, she was a senior writer at Congressional Quarterly magazine. Fessler worked at CQ for 13 years as both a reporter and editor, covering tax, budget, and other news. She also worked as a budget specialist at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, and was a reporter at The Record newspaper in Hackensack, NJ.

Fessler has a Masters of Public Administration from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University and a bachelor's degree from Douglass College in New Jersey.

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Story Archive

A Year After Russia Meddling, Off-Year Elections Are Monitored

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A bell ringer with the Salvation Army in New York City in 2014. Nonprofit groups estimate that the new tax bill proposed by House Republicans could reduce charitable giving by $13 billion annually. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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A sign appears outside the room where the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC, July 19, 2017. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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James Brown, who was homeless for more than 20 years in Los Angeles, in his apartment building in East Hollywood. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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In A Push To House The Homeless, High Prices Are Eroding Gains

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A roll of "I Voted" stickers sits on a table at an elementary school during the U.S. presidential election on November 8, 2016 in Dearborn, Mich. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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While Homelessness Escalates In Los Angeles, A Push For Veterans Got Him Off The Street

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From left, Bill Wanlund of the Falls Church electoral board, Jessica Wilson of voting machine company Hart InterCivic and David Bjerke, the Falls Church director of elections test the city's new voting machines ahead of this November's election. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Learning 2016's Lessons, Virginia Prepares Election Cyberdefenses

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Virginia Election Serves As First Test Of U.S. Voting System Security

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Russian-backed hackers targeted election systems in 21 states but federal officials had not told state election officials which states were targeted until now. Tami Chapell/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner (from right), Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and former Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell at the second meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, on Tuesday. Holly Ramer/AP hide caption

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Tension And Protests Mark Trump Voting Commission Meeting

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Kansas Secretary of State, Kris Kobach, left, and Vice President Pence at the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, in July. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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