Corey Flintoff Corey Flintoff is NPR's international correspondent based in Moscow, Russia.

Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov (poster in top left) is a staunch supporter of Russian President Vladimir Putin, but both men have been criticized by human rights groups. Tens of thousands of people took part in a state-sponsored rally in Chechnya's capital Grozny on Jan. 22, with many holding posters of Kadyrov, Putin (right) and Kadyrov's late father, Akhmad Kadyrov (center). Ilia Varlamov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ilia Varlamov/AFP/Getty Images

Chechnya's Strongman Praises Putin, Threatens 'Traitors'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/464552123/464664819" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Russia Dismisses British Report On Killing Of Former Spy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463865361/463865364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rescue workers help Russian Orthodox believers marking Epiphany by swimming late Monday in a pond in Pushkin, outside St. Petersburg. Thousands of Russian Orthodox Church followers plunged into icy rivers and ponds across the country. Dmitry Lovetsky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Dmitry Lovetsky/AP

In Russia, Epiphany Comes With A Shockingly Cold Swim

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463632705/463680969" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"I trust her, she is a very open person," Vladimir Putin said of German Chancellor Angela Merkel, seen here at last month's climate talks in Paris. But, he told the German daily Bild, "she is also subject to certain constraints and limitations." Alain Jocard/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alain Jocard/AFP/Getty Images

Russians flocked to Egypt's Red Sea resorts, like the one shown here in Sharm el-Sheikh on Nov. 7. But after a Russian plane was blown up, Russians have been barred from going. Russian tourists have also stopped going to Turkey, which recently shot down a Russian military plane. Ahmed Abd El-Latif/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ahmed Abd El-Latif/AP

Russians Find Favored Holiday Destinations Suddenly Off Limits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461595663/461782287" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mastermind In Russian Opposition Leader's Death Still At Large, Prosecutors Say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461568471/461568472" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

2 Willful Leaders Heighten Tensions Between Russia, Turkey

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461247375/461247376" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Rev. Vsevolod Chaplin, shown here in 2012, was dismissed with little explanation. The high-ranking religious conservative was known for making controversial statements about politics and public morals. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ivan Sekretarev/AP

The two sides of a new 100-ruble banknote depict a memorial to sunken ships in the port of Sevastopol, the site of Russia's naval base, and the Swallow's Nest, a mock castle on a clifftop near Yalta. Press-service of the Russian central bank/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Press-service of the Russian central bank/Reuters/Landov

During a Dec. 5 protest against new highway fees in Moscow, a Russian Communist Party supporter stood in front of a banner with portraits of wealthy businessmen including billionaire Arkady Rotenberg, far left. Rotenberg's son, Igor Rotenberg, controls the business operating the new road fee system. Sergei Ilnitsky/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

toggle caption
Sergei Ilnitsky/EPA /LANDOV

In A Rare Protest, Russian Truckers Rally Against Putin's Highway Tax

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/460703160/460784653" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Czar Nicholas II is shown with his family in the 1910s. All were executed shortly after the 1917 Russian Revolution. Remains of the czar, his wife, Alexandra (top right) and their children — Olga (from left), Maria, Anastasia, Alexei and Tatiana — have all been identified. Now the Russian Orthodox Church has ordered new DNA tests to confirm the identities of Maria and Alexei. Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images

Will DNA Tests Finally Settle Controversy Surrounding Russia's Last Czars?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/458014142/459936149" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When Russia began its bombing campaign in Syria, Russian officials said it would be a short-term air operation. Since then, things have gotten messier. In his state of the nation speech Thursday, President Putin reminded Russians that it took nearly a decade to crush terrorists who staged attacks around Russia in the 1990s. He cast the fight in Syria in similar terms. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ivan Sekretarev/AP

With Few Signs Of Progress, Russia's Putin Warns Of Long Fight In Syria

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/458503922/458503923" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Russia Changes Its Military Posture In Syria

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/458127699/458127700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript