Corey Flintoff
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Corey Flintoff

Activists from the Young Guard, which supports Russian President Vladimir Putin, have been protesting the Mormon church in Russia, calling it a "totalitarian cult." Konstantin Zavrazhin/Getty Images hide caption

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Konstantin Zavrazhin/Getty Images

In Russia, Pro-Putin Youths Protest Mormons As 'Cult'

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Artyom Savelyev, now 9, was sent back to Russia on a plane by his adoptive U.S. mother in 2010. The case stirred anger in Russia. Misha Japaridze/AP hide caption

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Misha Japaridze/AP

Russia May Try Reining In Drunk Airline Passengers

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Russia's Putin Welcomes Obama's Re-Election

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Russian President Vladimir Putin pilots a motorized hang glider while taking part in a project to help endangered cranes on Sept. 5. Shortly after, the president — who has cultivated the image of a man of action — was photographed wincing in apparent pain. Alexey Druzhinin/Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexey Druzhinin/Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin is widely expected to sign a parliamentary bill that expands the definition of high treason. Critics say the definition is overly broad and would give the government sweeping powers to crack down on opponents. Alexei Nikolsky/AP/RIA-Novosti hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP/RIA-Novosti

Deal Makes Russian Oil Company Biggest Producer

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Police officers detain Kirill Filimonov, one of the supporters of Radio Liberty in Moscow during a recent protest. The service will stop AM radio broadcasts and will become an Internet operation. It can also be heard on short wave radio. Natalia Kolesnikova /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Natalia Kolesnikova /AFP/Getty Images

Under President Vladimir Putin, Russia has been backing away from U.S. aid. Russia now says it does not want to extend a U.S. assistance program that has helped secure and dismantle nuclear weapons dating to the Soviet era. The program has been in place for two decades and has been considered a big success. Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images

Georgian billionaire and opposition leader Bidzina Ivanishvili (left) reacts with supporters at his office on Monday. Ivanishvili defeated Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili in the election, clearing the way for a new government. Uncredited/AP hide caption

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Uncredited/AP

Dovid Karpov has been the rabbi at the Darkei Shalom synagogue since it was built 15 years ago. Like many people in his congregation, Karpov grew up in a Soviet-era family that was not religious. He says he had to learn his faith for himself. Sergei Sotnikov/NPR hide caption

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Sergei Sotnikov/NPR

For Hasidic Jews, A Slow, Steady Rebirth In Russia

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