Rob Gifford Rob Gifford is the NPR foreign correspondent based in Shanghai.

Story Archive

From inside China, it often appears as if modern Chinese power is more aimed at erasing a painful past than at writing a dominant future. But there is one topic where the peace-loving Chinese seem worryingly militaristic: Taiwan. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

China's Rise: Inward-Looking Or Expansionist?

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Chinese Dissident Artist Ai WeiWei Released

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Commuters stand in front of billboards outside a shopping mall in Beijing. Brand logos are a common sight in China — but not for homegrown companies. Liu Jin/Getty Images hide caption

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Liu Jin/Getty Images

China's Businesses Boom, But Its Brands Don't

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Tennis Star Brings China Grand Slam Singles Win

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Chinese explorer Zheng He sailed on diplomatic and business missions in the early 1400s, reaching as far as northeast Africa. This sculpture of Zheng He is on display in the Asian Reading Room at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Starbard/NPR

China's Rise: A Quest To 'Hug The World'?

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China To Make Mastering Cyberwarfare A Priority

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Ek Sonn Chan of Cambodia accepts the 2006 Ramon Magsaysay Award for Government Service, in Manila, Philippines. Chan was cited for his "exemplary rehabilitation of a ruined public utility, bringing safe drinking water to a million people in Cambodia's capital city." Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

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Bullit Marquez/AP

Phnom Penh's Feat: Getting Clean Tap Water Flowing

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Green car technology is still in its infancy in China, and there's little uniformity in the way of infrastructure to support the vehicles, like this concept car with solar panels, made by Roewe, seen at the Shanghai auto show. Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images

Automakers Try To Convince Chinese To Drive Green

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Trucks left parked on a road near a Shanghai port Friday. Truck drivers protested for a third day over rising fuel costs and fees, disrupting the flow of goods. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Chinese Truck Drivers Block Port Over Gas Prices

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A man talks on the phone in Kesennuma Junior High School, which has now become a home for evacuees. A counselor says very few people have wanted to talk at the evacuation centers he's visited. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Grief-Stricken Japanese Reluctant To Open Up

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Ship owner Yuta Suzuki and one of his grounded vessels that was thrown on shore during the tsunami in Kesennuma, Miyagi prefecture. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

On Japan's Coast, Fishing Families Weigh Rebuilding

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Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s managing director, Akio Komori (left), cries as he leaves a press conference in Fukushima on Friday. The company has apologized for its handling of the nuclear crisis, but calls are growing for more monitoring and accountability of TEPCO and other large companies. AP hide caption

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AP

Company's Handling Of Nuclear Crisis Sparks Anger

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Notes of survivors looking for missing family members are posted on a board at the reporting center in Kamaishi. Roslan Rahman /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roslan Rahman /AFP/Getty Images

Tears Of Loss, Joy Are Common In Kamaishi, Japan

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Nurses wear radiation protection suits at a hospital in Minamisoma city in Fukushima prefecture on March 16. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Japan Calls For Help Evacuating At-Risk Residents

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Members of a U.S. search and rescue team from Los Angeles County stand in snow Thursday while on a recovery operation in Kamaishi, Japan. Two search and rescue teams from the U.S. and a team from the U.K., with combined numbers of around 220 personnel, are helping in the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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Matt Dunham/AP

U.S. Rescuer Sent To Japan: 'Off The Charts' Disaster

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