Tom Gjelten Tom Gjelten covers issues of religion, faith, and belief for NPR News.
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Tom Gjelten

In Information Age, Leaks Are Here To Stay

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Neodymium is displayed at the Inner Mongolia Baotou Steel Rare-Earth Hi-Tech Co. factory in Baotou, China. China has cornered the market on neodymium and other rare earths, with far-reaching implications for global trade. Nelson Ching/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Nelson Ching/Bloomberg via Getty Images

An image from the Iran International Photo Agency shows a view of the reactor building at the Russian-built Bushehr nuclear power plant. The Stuxnet worm was found on personal computers at the facility, but Iranian authorities said "major systems" were undamaged. IIPA/Getty hide caption

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IIPA/Getty

Seeing The Internet As An 'Information Weapon'

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Soldiers monitor computer screens inside the U.S. Central Command's mobile headquarters, in this U.S. military photo from 2002. A major concern regarding cyber warfare is the difficulty in distinguishing military targets from civilian targets. Gary P. Bonaccorso/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary P. Bonaccorso/Getty Images

Extending The Law Of War To Cyberspace

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Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad speaks at United Nations headquarters in New York on Tuesday. Seth Wenig/Associated Press hide caption

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Seth Wenig/Associated Press

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner told members of the Senate Banking Committee on Thursday that he shared their "frustration" over China's trade policies. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Shanghai's skyline is illuminated during the opening ceremony for the Shanghai 2010 World Exhibition on April 30. China's economic growth may have catapulted it past Japan to become the world's No. 2 economy, but the reaction from its leaders has been muted. Ian Langsdon/AP hide caption

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Ian Langsdon/AP

China's Economic Rise Enables Military Growth

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