Tom Gjelten Tom Gjelten covers issues of religion, faith, and belief for NPR News.
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Tom Gjelten

This image from the Federal Bureau of Investigation shows the remains of a pressure cooker that the FBI says was part of one of the bombs that exploded during the Boston Marathon. AP via FBI hide caption

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AP via FBI

Clues Suggest Boston Suspects Took A Do-It-Yourself Approach

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Two Young Men Suspected In Boston Bombing Attack

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Obama Visits Boston Service As Investigation Continues

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FBI Chastises Media For False Arrest Reports In Boston Bombing

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NPR's Tom Gjelten and Melissa Block discuss the story

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Venezuela's acting president, Nicolas Maduro, fist-bumps a worker of the state-run oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A., last month. Maduro faces opposition candidate Henrique Capriles in Sunday's presidential election. Whoever wins will have to tackle the legacy of Chavez's oil programs. Miraflores Presidential Press Office/AP hide caption

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Miraflores Presidential Press Office/AP

South Korea conducts military exercises near the border with North Korea on Wednesday. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

U.S. Parries N. Korean Threats With A Fresh Plan

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South Korean marines work on their K-55 self-propelled howitzers during an exercise against possible attacks by North Korea near the border village of Panmunjom in Paju, South Korea, Wednesday. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper says the danger of a devastating cyberattack is the No. 1 threat facing the U.S. He made the assessment Tuesday on Capitol Hill before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on worldwide threats. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Is All The Talk About Cyberwarfare Just Hype?

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