Tom Gjelten Tom Gjelten covers issues of religion, faith, and belief for NPR News.
Stories By

Tom Gjelten

An image from the Iran International Photo Agency shows a view of the reactor building at the Russian-built Bushehr nuclear power plant. The Stuxnet worm was found on personal computers at the facility, but Iranian authorities said "major systems" were undamaged. IIPA/Getty hide caption

toggle caption
IIPA/Getty

Seeing The Internet As An 'Information Weapon'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/130052701/130063029" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Soldiers monitor computer screens inside the U.S. Central Command's mobile headquarters, in this U.S. military photo from 2002. A major concern regarding cyber warfare is the difficulty in distinguishing military targets from civilian targets. Gary P. Bonaccorso/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gary P. Bonaccorso/Getty Images

Extending The Law Of War To Cyberspace

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/130023318/130036445" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad speaks at United Nations headquarters in New York on Tuesday. Seth Wenig/Associated Press hide caption

toggle caption
Seth Wenig/Associated Press

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner told members of the Senate Banking Committee on Thursday that he shared their "frustration" over China's trade policies. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Shanghai's skyline is illuminated during the opening ceremony for the Shanghai 2010 World Exhibition on April 30. China's economic growth may have catapulted it past Japan to become the world's No. 2 economy, but the reaction from its leaders has been muted. Ian Langsdon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ian Langsdon/AP

China's Economic Rise Enables Military Growth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129284282/129357246" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workboats operate near the Transocean Development Drilling Rig II at the site of the Deepwater Horizon incident in the Gulf of Mexico earlier this month. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Dave Martin/AP

U.S. Marines lead an Afghan detainee toward their combat outpost for questioning in a Taliban stronghold area in Marjah, Helmand province, southern Afghanistan, April 1, 2010. The leak of more than 90,000 secret military intelligence reports on the war in Afghanistan paints a grim and often discouraging picture of the situation on the ground. Mauricio Lima/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mauricio Lima/AFP/Getty Images

Leaked Documents Offer Window Into Afghan War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/128766771/128766828" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team/National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center is designed to help protect the technical infrastructure of the United States. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Cyberwarrior Shortage Threatens U.S. Security

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/128574055/128614371" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript