Tom Gjelten Tom Gjelten covers issues of religion, faith, and belief for NPR News.
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Tom Gjelten

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett speaks during her confirmation hearing Tuesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Patrick Semansky/Pool/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/Pool/AP

Needing The Support Of Catholic Women, Democrats Are Careful With Amy Coney Barrett

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Can Amy Coney Barrett's Nomination To The Supreme Court Be A Win For Democrats?

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Religious leaders urge people of faith to pray for political leaders, both in general and when those elected officials are ill, even if people disagree with those leaders' policies. Paula Bronstein/AP hide caption

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Paula Bronstein/AP

The U.S. flag and flag of Vatican City are hung on the outside of the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference building in Harrisburg, Pa., on March 26, 2019. Catholics outnumber Evangelicals in Pennsylvania by a 2-to-1 margin. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Catholic Voters In Pennsylvania Talk About The Presidential Election

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What Catholics In Pennsylvania Think About The Upcoming Election

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Judge Amy Coney Barrett speaks after President Donald Trump announced her as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House on Sept. 26. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Amy Coney Barrett's Catholicism Is Controversial But May Not Be Confirmation Issue

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At Senate Hearings, Coney Barrett Could Face Questions About Catholic Beliefs

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In this May 28, 1957, photo, Rev. Robert S. Graetz, center, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, left, talk outside the witness room during a bombing trial in Montgomery, Ala. Graetz, the only white minister to support the Montgomery Bus Boycott, died Sunday, Sept. 20, 2020. He was 92. AP hide caption

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AP

Robert Graetz, Only White Pastor To Back Montgomery Bus Boycott, Dies At 92

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Black Pastor Wants His Mostly White Congregation To Understand Racial Justice

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Former Notre Dame football coach Lou Holtz speaks from Orlando, Fla., during the third night of the Republican National Convention on Wednesday. Holtz questioned Democratic candidate Joe Biden's Catholic faith. Courtesy of the Committee on Arrangements for the 2020 Republican National Committee via AP hide caption

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Courtesy of the Committee on Arrangements for the 2020 Republican National Committee via AP

Political Conventions Show How Religion Is Playing A Role In Campaigns

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A parishioner sits after Mass last month at a Catholic church in New York City. An overwhelming majority of U.S. adults believe that houses of worship should be subject to the same restrictions on public gatherings that apply to other institutions. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

2 Out Of 3 Churchgoers: It's Safe To Resume In-Person Worship

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