Tom Goldman Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and on NPR.org.
Tom Goldman at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Stories By

Tom Goldman

Allison Shelley/NPR
Tom Goldman at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tom Goldman

Correspondent, Sports

Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and on NPR.org.

With a beat covering the entire world of professional sports, both in and outside of the United States, Goldman reporting covers the broad spectrum of athletics from the people to the business of athletics.

During his nearly 30 years with NPR, Goldman has covered every major athletic competition including the Super Bowl, the World Series, the NBA Finals, golf and tennis championships, and the Olympic Games.

His pieces are diverse and include both perspective and context. Goldman often explores people's motivations for doing what they do, whether it's solo sailing around the world or pursuing a gold medal. In his reporting, Goldman searches for the stories about the inspirational and relatable amateur and professional athletes.

Goldman contributed to NPR's 2009 Edward R. Murrow award for his coverage of the 2008 Beijing Olympics and to a 2010 Murrow Award for contribution to a series on high school football, "Friday Night Lives." Earlier in his career, Goldman's piece about Native American basketball players earned a 2004 Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award from the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University and a 2004 Unity Award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association.

In January 1990, Goldman came to NPR to work as an associate producer for sports with Morning Edition. For the next seven years he reported, edited, and produced stories and programs. In June 1997, he became NPR's first full-time sports correspondent.

For five years before NPR, Goldman worked as a news reporter and then news director in local public radio. In 1984, he spent a year living on an Israeli kibbutz. Two years prior he took his first professional job in radio in Anchorage, Alaska, at the Alaska Public Radio Network.

Story Archive

Protests Have Persisted Outside Of The Tokyo Olympics

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People take pictures as the Olympic rings lit up at dusk on the Odaiba waterfront in Tokyo on Thursday, the eve of the official start of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images

Tokyo Olympic Games Grapple With Pandemic Safety Protocols

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United States pitcher Monica Abbott trains at the Fukushima Azuma Baseball Stadium ahead of the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 20, 2021, in Fukushima, Japan. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Why People Call Shohei Ohtani A 'Once In A Century' Baseball Player

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ESPN Reporter Rachel Nichols Has Been Removed After Her Phone Conversation Leak

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Track And Field Star Sha'Carri Richardson Won't Compete In The Tokyo Olympics

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U.S. Sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson Left Off Relay List, Won't Compete At Olympics

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Saturday Sports: Sha'Carri Richardson Suspended For Positive Marijuana Test

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American Sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson Is Suspended After Positive Marijuana Test

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Chauncey Billups, left, poses with Portland General Manager Neil Olshey after Billups was announced as the head coach of the Portland Trail Blazers at the team's practice facility on June 29, 2021. Craig Mitchelldyer/AP hide caption

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Craig Mitchelldyer/AP

2 New NBA Coaching Hires Create Unwanted Controversy For A Progressive League

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The Controversies Surrounding 2 New NBA Head Coaches

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The March Madness logo on the court during the Sweet Sixteen round of the 2021 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament in Indianapolis. Soon, some college athletes can get money when using their name, image or likeness. Justin Casterline/Getty Images hide caption

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A New Era Dawns In College Sports, As The NCAA Scrambles To Keep Up

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