Tom Goldman Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and NPR.org.
Tom Goldman
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Tom Goldman

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Tom Goldman at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tom Goldman

Correspondent, Sports

Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and NPR.org.

With a beat covering the entire world of professional sports, both in and outside of the United States, Goldman reporting covers the broad spectrum of athletics from the people to the business of athletics.

During his more than 20 years with NPR, Goldman has covered every major athletic competition including the Super Bowl, the World Series, the NBA Finals, golf and tennis championships, and the Olympic Games.

His pieces are diverse and include both perspective and context. Goldman often explores people's motivations for doing what they do, whether it's solo sailing around the world or pursuing a gold medal. In his reporting, Goldman searches for the stories about the inspirational and relatable amateur and professional athletes.

Goldman contributed to NPR's 2009 Edward R. Murrow award for his coverage of the 2008 Beijing Olympics and to a 2010 Murrow award for contribution to a series on high school football, "Friday Night Lives." Earlier in his career, Goldman's piece about Native American basketball players earned a 2004 Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award from the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University and a 2004 Unity Award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association.

In January 1990, Goldman came to NPR to work as an associate producer for sports with Morning Edition. For the next seven years he reported, edited and produced stories and programs. In June 1997, he became NPR's first full time sports correspondent.

For five years before NPR, Goldman worked as a news reporter and then news director in local public radio. In 1984, he spent a year living on an Israeli kibbutz. Two years prior he took his first professional job in radio in Anchorage, Alaska, at the Alaska Public Radio Network.

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Story Archive

Tim Green, a former NFL player and former NPR commentator, has ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Green believes football gave him the disease. Heather Ainsworth for NPR hide caption

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Heather Ainsworth for NPR

Former NFL Player Tim Green Has A New Opponent — ALS

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Saturday Sports: NCAA Women's Basketball And The Denver Nuggets

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Ohio State's Head Football Coach Set To Retire Next Month

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NFL Faces More Backlash Over Kareem Hunt Video

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Malheur Enterprise reporters Pat Caldwell (from left) and Kristine de Leon; Les Zaitz, editor and publisher; and, sitting on the floor, reporter Jayme Fraser meet to talk about assignments. Tom Goldman/NPR hide caption

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Digging Deep Into Local News, A Small Newspaper In Rural Oregon Is Thriving

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Number Of Missing Climbs In Deadly California Wildfire

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1 School Left In Paradise After Others Destroyed By The Camp Fire

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Dick Fosbury set an Olympic record as he cleared the bar in the high jump event at 7 feet, 4 1/4 inches in the 1968 Olympics in Mexico. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive via Getty Images hide caption

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Dick Fosbury Turned His Back On The Bar And Made A Flop A Success

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Mary Bono Resigns As USA Gymnastics' Interim CEO

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The Week In Sports: MLB Playoffs, Team USA Could Win A Spot In Women's World Cup

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American Flat Track motorcycle racer Shayna Texter poses with a young fan during an autograph session at Canterbury Park outside Minneapolis. Texter is one of the most popular racers on the AFT circuit and, in 2011, became the first woman in the history of flat track racing to win a professional singles main event. Tom Goldman/NPR hide caption

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'Hold Your Breath,' American Flat Track Racing Mounts A Comeback

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After 4 Back Surgeries, Tiger Woods Wins His First Golf Tournament

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