Tom Goldman Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and on NPR.org.
Tom Goldman at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Tom Goldman

College Athletes In California Can Now Be Paid Under Fair Pay To Play Act

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Saturday Sports: Antonio Brown, Soccer Vs. Politics, WNBA Playoffs

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Veteran NFL Kicker Battles 'Demons' That Can Come With The Job

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California Could Radically Alter Amateur Rules In College Sports

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Saturday Sports: U.S. Open, NFL

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Eleven-year-old Ella Koehler, of Seattle United soccer club, heads the ball at a practice on the University of Washington campus. It's the first year she and her teammates of the same age can use the technique. A 2015 rule by the U.S. Soccer Federation banned heading for kids ages 10 years old and younger. Tom Goldman/NPR hide caption

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Women's Soccer Stars Concerned About Trauma From Repetitive Head Impact

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Alabama Coach Nick Saban roams the field during practice in Tuscaloosa. The Crimson Tide enters the season ranked No. 2 and aiming to reclaim its national championship throne. Russell Lewis/NPR hide caption

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Tide Rolls Back In: Alabama Hopes To Not Squander Last Year's Championship 'Failure'

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Saturday Sports: Women's Soccer Team, Jay-Z

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Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan, center, wears a T-shirt honoring Megan Rapinoe, right, of the U.S. women's World Cup champion soccer team and the Seattle Storm's Sue Bird, left, before a WNBA game on July 12. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

After World Cup Win, Other U.S. Women's Sports Leagues Ask, 'What About Us?'

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Fans react to a play on the field. Ilana Panich-Linsman for NPR hide caption

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Ilana Panich-Linsman for NPR

Women's World Cup Bump — Short-Lived Or Longer?

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Sports Roundup: Boxing Deaths, Olympic Swimming And The WNBA

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U.S. Women's National Team players celebrate with the FIFA Women's World Cup Trophy following team's victory Sunday. Maja Hitij/Getty Images hide caption

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Maja Hitij/Getty Images

Equal Pay For Equal Play; The U.S. Women's Soccer Team Tackles Its Next Quest

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