Tom Goldman Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and on NPR.org.
Tom Goldman at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Tom Goldman

Allison Shelley/NPR
Tom Goldman at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Tom Goldman

Correspondent, Sports

Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and on NPR.org.

With a beat covering the entire world of professional sports, both in and outside of the United States, Goldman reporting covers the broad spectrum of athletics from the people to the business of athletics.

During his nearly 30 years with NPR, Goldman has covered every major athletic competition including the Super Bowl, the World Series, the NBA Finals, golf and tennis championships, and the Olympic Games.

His pieces are diverse and include both perspective and context. Goldman often explores people's motivations for doing what they do, whether it's solo sailing around the world or pursuing a gold medal. In his reporting, Goldman searches for the stories about the inspirational and relatable amateur and professional athletes.

Goldman contributed to NPR's 2009 Edward R. Murrow award for his coverage of the 2008 Beijing Olympics and to a 2010 Murrow Award for contribution to a series on high school football, "Friday Night Lives." Earlier in his career, Goldman's piece about Native American basketball players earned a 2004 Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award from the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University and a 2004 Unity Award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association.

In January 1990, Goldman came to NPR to work as an associate producer for sports with Morning Edition. For the next seven years he reported, edited, and produced stories and programs. In June 1997, he became NPR's first full-time sports correspondent.

For five years before NPR, Goldman worked as a news reporter and then news director in local public radio. In 1984, he spent a year living on an Israeli kibbutz. Two years prior he took his first professional job in radio in Anchorage, Alaska, at the Alaska Public Radio Network.

Story Archive

Gregg Berhalter, head coach of United States team, looks on during a training session on Monday in Doha, Qatar. The U.S. faces Iran in a crucial match on Tuesday. Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images

What's at stake as the U.S. faces Iran at the World Cup

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U.S. will play Iran for a place in the knockout stage at the FIFA World Cup

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Saturday Sports: Qatar out of FIFA World Cup; American football season picks up

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U.S. takes on England in the World Cup after it tied Wales in group play

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Tim Weah of the United States celebrates after scoring the team's goal during a World Cup match against Wales on November 21, 2022 in Doha, Qatar. Wales and the U-S finished 1-1. Ryan Pierse/Getty Images hide caption

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For Tim Weah, a World Cup goal capped a family journey. Now he's ready for England

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U.S. forward Tim Weah scores the team's only goal in its World Cup opener

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The U.S. takes on Wales in the World Cup

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The U.S. men's national team celebrates after Timothy Weah's goal in the first half of a match with Wales in the FIFA World Cup. Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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The captain's armband, similar to this one, shown during a September game between Germany and Hungary. European national teams have told their captains not to wear it during the 2022 World Cup in Qatar. Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images hide caption

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The U.S. begins its World Cup action against Wales

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Al-Bayt Stadium in al-Khor hosts the opening game of the 2022 World Cup between host country Qatar and Ecuador. Gabriel Bouys/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saturday Sports: FIFA World Cup kicks off amid controversy in Qatar

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Qatar bans beer sales at World Cup stadiums, two days before it begins

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