Richard Gonzales Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco.
Richard Gonzales
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Richard Gonzales

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Richard Gonzales at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Richard Gonzales

Correspondent, San Francisco, National Desk

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

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Michelle Kenney, the mother of Antwon Rose II, leaves the Allegheny County, Pa., Courthouse Friday. She did not show emotion as she heard former police officer Michael Rosfeld found not guilty in the death of her son. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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In this photo, taken on Tuesday, smoke rises from a fire at the Intercontinental Terminals Co. near the Carpenter Elementary School in Deer Park, Texas. The blaze briefly reignited on Friday. Jeffrey Fountain/AP hide caption

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Women wore headscarves as they gathered for the Muslim call to prayer in Hagley Park in Christchurch on Friday. The call was broadcast across New Zealand in memory of 50 people who were killed in attacks at two mosques last Friday. Marty Melville/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to the parliament Tuesday as New Zealand considers new gun laws after the mass shooting in that stunned the country. Mark Tantrum/Getty Images hide caption

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New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern addresses the media on March 16 in Wellington, New Zealand. Ardern said she would seek a change in her country's gun laws after after at least one man opened fire during afternoon prayers Friday and killed at least 49 people at two mosques in Christchurch. Mark Tantrum/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Attorney Robert Hur (center) discusses the charges against Christopher Hasson with Art Walker (left) of the Coast Guard investigative service, and FBI special agent Gordon Johnson last month. Michael Kunzelman/AP hide caption

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Debris from an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 jet sits in a field near Bishoftu, where the plane crashed after taking off from Ethiopia's capital city, Addis Ababa, on Sunday. Michael Tewelde/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Tewelde/AFP/Getty Images

FAA To Order Changes In Boeing 737 Max Jets After Ethiopian Airlines Crash

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