Richard Gonzales Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco.
Richard Gonzales
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Richard Gonzales

A street candy seller walks along the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Mexicali, Mexico, while U.S. Army soldiers fortify it with barbed wire. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is likely to reduce the number of active-duty U.S. troops who are currently deployed at the Mexico border, from around 5,900 to around 4,000. Luis Boza/VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Boza/VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images

Police respond on Sept. 17, 2017, in St. Louis to demonstrators protesting the acquittal of former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley, who had been charged with first-degree murder in a 2011 on-duty shooting. A federal grand jury on Thursday indicted three officers who responded to the protests in the beating of a fourth officer, who was working undercover that night. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Military personnel and Customs and Border Protection officers gather at the San Ysidro Port of Entry in San Diego. The number of immigrants in the U.S. without legal status has declined to its lowest level in more than a decade, according to a new report released Tuesday. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Migrants walk to the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana, Mexico, last week to make requests for political asylum. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Trump Administration Faces 2 Legal Challenges For Asylum Restrictions

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An aerial view of a neighborhood destroyed by the Camp Fire in Paradise, Calif. Fueled by high winds and low humidity, the wildfire ripped through the town, charring more than 140,000 acres and killing more than 70 people. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Chris and Nancy Brown embrace while searching through the remains of their home, leveled by the Camp Fire in Paradise, Calif. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

California's Camp Fire Becomes The Deadliest Wildfire In State History

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As the Camp Fire burns nearby, a scorched car rests by gas pumps on Sunday near Pulga, Calif., a community located in Northern California's Butte County. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Death Toll In California Wildfires Climbs To 44

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Firefighters try to beat back the Woolsey Fire in the early hours of Friday. One day earlier, the blaze ignited as mourning residents tried to cope with quite another kind of terror in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Eric Thayer/Reuters hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Reuters

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival recipients and other young immigrants rally at the U.S. Capitol in Washington in March. A federal appeals court has blocked the Trump administration's effort to end the program. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP