Richard Gonzales Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco.
Richard Gonzales at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Richard Gonzales

U.S. Citizen Stranded In Yemen Sues State Department

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U.S. Judge To Rule On Asylum Challenge Involving Families From Central America

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San Francisco Police Texting Scandal Could Compromise Thousands Of Cases

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Oakland police officers, wearing body cameras, form a line during demonstrations against recent incidents of alleged police brutality nationwide. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

California Bill Could Limit Police Access To Body Camera Footage

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Dead almonds on a drought-stricken tree near Fresno, Calif., on April 10, 2015. Michael Nelson/EPA/Corbis hide caption

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Michael Nelson/EPA/Corbis

How Almonds Became A Scapegoat For California's Drought

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California Plastic Bag Referendum Could Spark Environmental Showdown

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The California Supreme Court righted what it called a "grievous wrong" by posthumously granting a law license to Hong Yen Chang, a Chinese immigrant whose application was denied because of his race 125 years ago. AP/Ah Tye Family hide caption

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AP/Ah Tye Family

A Chinese Immigrant Gets His California Law License, 125 Years Later

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