Richard Gonzales Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco.
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Several hundred faculty had signed a letter saying University of Southern California President C.L. Max Nikias had "lost the moral authority to lead." Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

Vehicles wait for inspection at the Border Patrol's Laredo North vehicle checkpoint in Laredo, Texas. A border agent killed an immigrant woman in Rio Bravo, near Laredo on Wednesday. The shooting is being investigated by the Texas Rangers and the FBI. Nomaan Merchant/AP hide caption

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Nomaan Merchant/AP

Border Patrol Shooting Death Of Immigrant Woman Raises Tensions In South Texas

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Court Sides With Transgender Student In Bathroom Case

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White House Chief of Staff John Kelly in his office in the West Wing. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

John Kelly On Trump, The Russia Investigation And Separating Immigrant Families

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Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in January. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Homeland Security Secretary Defends Separating Families Who Cross Border Illegally

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DHS Ends Temporary Protected Status For Hondurans

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Members of the opposition to the administration of Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez march on Friday to protest the U.S. government's decision to end the Temporary Protected Status designation for nearly 57,000 people from Honduras. Hernandez called the decision a sovereign issue for Washington, adding that "we deeply lament it." Fernando Antonio/AP hide caption

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Fernando Antonio/AP