Richard Gonzales Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco.
Richard Gonzales at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Richard Gonzales

Officials Race To Meet Deadline To Re-Unite Migrant Children With Parents

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The E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse in Washington, D.C., where a federal judge ruled against the Trump administration's detention of asylum-seekers. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Federal Judge Orders Administration To End Arbitrary Detention Of Asylum-Seekers

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Where The Trump Administration's 'Zero Tolerance' Policy Stands Now

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Central American immigrants depart ICE custody, pending future immigration court hearings, on June 11 in McAllen, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Trump's Migrant Family Policy Now Moves To The Courts

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Watched by Vice President Pence, President Trump on Wednesday shows an executive order on immigration aimed at putting an end to the controversial separation of migrant families at the border. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

A photo provided by U.S. Customs and Border Protection shows the interior of a CBP facility in McAllen, Texas, on Sunday. Immigration officials have separated thousands of families who crossed the border illegally. Reporters taken on a tour of the facility were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos, the AP reported. U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP hide caption

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP

A 2-year-old Honduran girl cries as her mother, who seeks asylum, is detained at the Southern border near McAllen, Texas, in June. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Boys 10 to 17 years old stand outside a government-contracted youth shelter in Brownsville, Texas. Ninety percent of the residents traveled to the United States alone seeking protection; the remainder were separated from their families at the border under a controversial new policy by the Trump administration. Department of Health and Human Services hide caption

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Department of Health and Human Services

'These Are Not Kids Kept In Cages': Inside A Texas Shelter For Immigrant Youth

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Detained immigrant children line up in the cafeteria at the Karnes County Residential Center, in Texas. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Trump Administration And Advocates Clash Over What's Next For Migrant Children

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