Richard Gonzales Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco.
Richard Gonzales
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Richard Gonzales

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Richard Gonzales at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Richard Gonzales

Correspondent, San Francisco, National Desk

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

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Central American migrants walk along the U.S. border fence looking for places to cross, in Tijuana, Mexico. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

7-Year-Old Migrant Girl Dies Of Dehydration And Shock In U.S. Border Patrol Custody

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Police officers stand near the place where Cherif Chekatt, the alleged gunman who had been a fugitive since allegedly killing three people at a popular Christmas market in Strasbourg, France, was shot dead by police on Thursday. Sebastien Bozon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Contractors work to reinforce a section of the U.S. border wall in San Diego where scores of Central American migrants have crossed illegally in recent weeks, shot through the fence from Tijuana, Mexico. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Juan David Ortiz, a U.S. Border Patrol supervisor, who was indicted Wednesday on charges of capital murder in the killings of four women in Texas. Webb County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Webb County Sheriff's Office via AP

A street candy seller walks along the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Mexicali, Mexico, while U.S. Army soldiers fortify it with barbed wire. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is likely to reduce the number of active-duty U.S. troops who are currently deployed at the Mexico border, from around 5,900 to around 4,000. Luis Boza/VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Boza/VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images