Richard Gonzales Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco.
Richard Gonzales
Steve Barrett/N/A

Richard Gonzales

Correspondent, San Francisco, National Desk

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

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Muslim and civil rights groups and their supporters in Washington, D.C., protest the Trump administration's travel ban in October. The Supreme Court said Monday the ban can be fully enforced for now. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Supreme Court OKs Trump Travel Ban Pending Lower Court Rulings

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Broken Bow Arch rises from Willow Canyon in the Escalante Canyons region of Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

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Trump Orders Largest National Monument Reduction In U.S. History

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Jose Ines Garcia Zarate is led into a San Francisco courtroom by his lawyer in 2015. Garcia Zarate faces a new federal warrant and deportation. Michael Macor/AP hide caption

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Jose Ines Garcia Zarate in a police booking photo. San Francisco jurors have returned a verdict in his trial for the fatal shooting of Kate Steinle, whose death played into the national debate on immigration. AP hide caption

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