Richard Gonzales Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco.
Richard Gonzales
Steve Barrett/N/A

Richard Gonzales

Correspondent, San Francisco, National Desk

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

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Story Archive

Central American immigrants depart ICE custody, pending future immigration court hearings, on June 11 in McAllen, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Trump's Migrant Family Policy Now Moves To The Courts

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Watched by Vice President Pence, President Trump on Wednesday shows an executive order on immigration aimed at putting an end to the controversial separation of migrant families at the border. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

A photo provided by U.S. Customs and Border Protection shows the interior of a CBP facility in McAllen, Texas, on Sunday. Immigration officials have separated thousands of families who crossed the border illegally. Reporters taken on a tour of the facility were not allowed by agents to interview any of the detainees or take photos, the AP reported. U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP hide caption

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP

A 2-year-old Honduran girl cries as her mother, who seeks asylum, is detained at the Southern border near McAllen, Texas, in June. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Boys 10 to 17 years old stand outside a government-contracted youth shelter in Brownsville, Texas. Ninety percent of the residents traveled to the United States alone seeking protection; the remainder were separated from their families at the border under a controversial new policy by the Trump administration. Department of Health and Human Services hide caption

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Department of Health and Human Services

'These Are Not Kids Kept In Cages': Inside A Texas Shelter For Immigrant Youth

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Detained immigrant children line up in the cafeteria at the Karnes County Residential Center, in Texas. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Trump Administration And Advocates Clash Over What's Next For Migrant Children

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Voters in Santa Clara County are deciding Tuesday whether to remove Judge Aaron Persky from office after he sentenced a former Stanford University swimmer convicted of sexual assault to a short jail sentence instead of prison. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Several hundred faculty had signed a letter saying University of Southern California President C.L. Max Nikias had "lost the moral authority to lead." Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

Vehicles wait for inspection at the Border Patrol's Laredo North vehicle checkpoint in Laredo, Texas. A border agent killed an immigrant woman in Rio Bravo, near Laredo on Wednesday. The shooting is being investigated by the Texas Rangers and the FBI. Nomaan Merchant/AP hide caption

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Nomaan Merchant/AP

Border Patrol Shooting Death Of Immigrant Woman Raises Tensions In South Texas

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Court Sides With Transgender Student In Bathroom Case

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