Richard Gonzales Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco.
Richard Gonzales
Steve Barrett/N/A

Richard Gonzales

Correspondent, San Francisco, National Desk

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

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A house is surrounded by flood water in Lumberton, N.C., on Monday. Alex Edelman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Florence Death Toll Rises To 32 As Rivers Continue To Flood In N.C. And S.C.

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Jacob Harrelson and his wife, Beth, install protective plywood on a local business in anticipation of Hurricane Florence in Wilmington, N.C., on Wednesday. Phyllis B. Dooney for NPR hide caption

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Florence Making Landfall On Carolina Coast, Bringing Storm Surge, Heavy Rain

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Children and workers are seen at a tent encampment built near the Tornillo Port of Entry in June in Tornillo, Texas. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Ericka Ames, center, of Nicaragua recites the Oath of Allegiance during a naturalization ceremony at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in Miami. The backlog of citizenship applications has increased dramatically under the Trump administration. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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The Wait To Become A U.S. Citizen Lengthens

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Migrant Teens Restrained But Not Abused, Virginia Report Finds

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Supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act (DACA), gay activists and others demonstrate outside the U.S. District Court 9th Circuit in Pasadena, Calif., in May. The Trump administration has been trying to convince courts that it is justified in ending an Obama-era immigration policy that shielded hundreds of thousands of young immigrants from deportation. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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Immigration Debate Shifts To Texas Judge Who Blocked 2015 DACA Expansion

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