Richard Gonzales Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco.
Richard Gonzales
Steve Barrett/N/A

Richard Gonzales

Correspondent, San Francisco, National Desk

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

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Several hundred faculty had signed a letter saying University of Southern California President C.L. Max Nikias had "lost the moral authority to lead." Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Vehicles wait for inspection at the Border Patrol's Laredo North vehicle checkpoint in Laredo, Texas. A border agent killed an immigrant woman in Rio Bravo, near Laredo on Wednesday. The shooting is being investigated by the Texas Rangers and the FBI. Nomaan Merchant/AP hide caption

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Nomaan Merchant/AP

Border Patrol Shooting Death Of Immigrant Woman Raises Tensions In South Texas

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Court Sides With Transgender Student In Bathroom Case

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White House Chief of Staff John Kelly in his office in the West Wing. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John Kelly On Trump, The Russia Investigation And Separating Immigrant Families

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Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in January. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Homeland Security Secretary Defends Separating Families Who Cross Border Illegally

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DHS Ends Temporary Protected Status For Hondurans

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Members of the opposition to the administration of Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez march on Friday to protest the U.S. government's decision to end the Temporary Protected Status designation for nearly 57,000 people from Honduras. Hernandez called the decision a sovereign issue for Washington, adding that "we deeply lament it." Fernando Antonio/AP hide caption

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