Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. Currently he focuses on neuroscience, health risks, and extreme weather.

In sighted people, the part of the brain that recognizes faces is linked to the brain's visual system. But in blind people it seems wired to circuits that process sound. Tina Zellmer/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption
Tina Zellmer/Ikon Images/Corbis

Blind From Birth, But Able To Use Sound To 'See' Faces

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/365486921/365638465" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A tangle of protein (green) in this scanning electron micrograph of a brain cell of an Alzheimer's patient lies within the cytoplasm (blue) of the cell. The tangle consists of clumps of a toxic form of tau. Thomas J. Deerinck/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas J. Deerinck/Corbis

Toxic Tau Of Alzheimer's May Offer A Path To Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/364760924/364760925" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mariama and Fomba Kanneh play in an open space in Barkedu, Liberia. With schools closed across the country, many kids spend their time playing outside every day. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Ebola Today Could Mean Illiteracy Tomorrow In West Africa

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/362302778/362952923" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The nursing staff get a break at the Ebola care center run by Doctors Without Borders in Foya, Liberia. The center has helped stop the spread of the virus. Michealeen Doucleff/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Michealeen Doucleff/NPR

An Ebola Strategy Brings Good News To One Liberian Town

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/359355410/359512049" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A mom at the Community Clinic in Louisiana Township, about 15 miles from Monrovia, says all of her children have been vaccinated. Jon Hamilton/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Hamilton/NPR

Ebola Is Keeping Kids From Getting Vaccinated In Liberia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/358117900/358238976" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Angie Gardea depends on her job at a hair salon to put food on the table. But because of the Ebola outbreak, business has been slow. Customers are afraid to come in. Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR

For Healthy Liberians, Life Continues — With Some Adjustments

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/357794239/357859551" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Rev. Herman Browne voluntarily quarantined himself for 21 days after his wife's friend tested positive for Ebola. On Sunday, he returned to his church, Trinity Cathedral, to preach to his congregation about Ebola prevention. Jon Hamilton/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Hamilton/NPR

Ebola In Church: A Reverend's Quarantine Spreads The Word

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/357399593/357508921" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Allan Ropper speaks with residents and fellows as they do rounds at the neuroscience intensive care unit at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. M. Scott Brauer for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
M. Scott Brauer for NPR

A Doctor Unlocks Mysteries Of The Brain By Talking And Watching

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/351537980/352402886" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Justin McCowan poses for a portrait outside of his house in Santa Monica, Calif., on Aug. 14. Benjamin B. Morris for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Benjamin B. Morris for NPR

Death Cuts Short The Life Of An Alzheimer's Research Volunteer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/350678572/350803039" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some neighborhoods in this "Mayberry by the Sea" could be underwater within a few decades, according to some projections. Jon Hamilton/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Hamilton/NPR

A Coastal Paradise Confronts Its Watery Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/348985568/349626369" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Justin McCowan, 39, has Down syndrome and lives at home with his parents in Santa Monica, Calif. Benjamin B. Morris for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Benjamin B. Morris for NPR

People With Down Syndrome Are Pioneers In Alzheimer's Research

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/341672950/343073952" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Deion Jefferson, 10, and Samuel Jefferson, 7, take turns climbing and jumping off a stack of old tires at the Berkeley Adventure Playground in California. The playground is a half-acre park with a junkyard feel where kids are encouraged to "play wild." David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
David Gilkey/NPR

Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/336361277/338234108" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript