Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. Currently he focuses on neuroscience, health risks, and extreme weather.
Jon Hamilton 2010
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Jon Hamilton

A soldier fires a Carl Gustav recoilless rifle system during weapons practice in Helmand province, Afghanistan. Heavy weapons like these generate a shock wave that may cause brain injuries. Sgt. Benjamin Tuck/CJSOTF-A/DVIDS hide caption

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Sgt. Benjamin Tuck/CJSOTF-A/DVIDS

Pentagon Shelves Blast Gauges Meant To Detect Battlefield Brain Injuries

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Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images

Zap! Magnet Study Offers Fresh Insights Into How Memory Works

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In a cluster of glowing human stem cells, one cell divides. The cell membrane is shown in purple, while DNA in the dividing nucleus is blue. The white fibers linking the nucleus are spindles, which aid in cell division. Allen Institute for Cell Science hide caption

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Allen Institute for Cell Science

Comparative psychologist Claudia Fugazza and her dog demonstrate the "Do As I Do" method of exploring canine memory. Mirko Lui/Cell Press hide caption

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Mirko Lui/Cell Press

Your Dog Remembers Every Move You Make

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Ippei Naoi/Getty Images

Heavy Screen Time Rewires Young Brains, For Better And Worse

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This image is from lab-grown brain tissue — a minibrain — infected by Zika virus (white) with neural stem cells in red and neuronal nuclei in green. Courtesy of Xuyu Qian and Guo-li Ming hide caption

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Courtesy of Xuyu Qian and Guo-li Ming

'Minibrains' Could Help Drug Discovery For Zika And For Alzheimer's

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Robert Gaunt tests Nathan Copeland's ability to detect touch by tapping fingers on a robotic hand. UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences hide caption

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UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences

Brain Implant Restores Sense Of Touch To Paralyzed Man

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Brain Game Claims Fail A Big Scientific Test

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Rats are great at remembering where they last sniffed the strawberries. Alexey Krasaven/Flickr hide caption

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Alexey Krasaven/Flickr

Rats That Reminisce May Lead To Better Tests For Alzheimer's Drugs

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Charles Mayer, 30, of San Diego survived an IED attack while serving in Iraq in 2010, but has suffered from complications including PTSD. Stuart Palley for NPR hide caption

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Stuart Palley for NPR

War Studies Suggest A Concussion Leaves The Brain Vulnerable To PTSD

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Simone Biles flies through the air while performing on the balance beam at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

How A 'Sixth Sense' Helps Simone Biles Fly, And The Rest Of Us Walk

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Stuart Kinlough/Getty Images/Ikon Images

When Blind People Do Algebra, The Brain's Visual Areas Light Up

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Experimental drugs that clear clumps of proteins from the brains of Alzheimer's patients haven't panned out yet. Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images

Test Of Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Finds Progress Against Brain Plaques

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Kelly Slater Wave Co Todd Glaser/Courtesy of Kelly Slater Wave Co hide caption

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Todd Glaser/Courtesy of Kelly Slater Wave Co

Surfers And Scientists Team Up To Create The 'Perfect Wave'

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