Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
Jon Hamilton 2010
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Jon Hamilton

Why The 'Nightmare Superbug' Isn't As Scary As It Sounds

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Pain Really Is All In Your Head And Emotion Controls Intensity

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Eastman Chemical went a step beyond calling Tritan plastic BPA-free, setting off a legal challenge. Eastman hide caption

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Eastman

Beyond BPA: Court Battle Reveals A Shift In Debate Over Plastic Safety

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Juniper Russo walks her dogs with her daughter Vivian (left). Courtesy of Juniper Russo hide caption

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Courtesy of Juniper Russo

Once A Vaccine Skeptic, This Mom Changed Her Mind

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Leaks in a barrier between blood vessels and brain cells could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's. VEM/Science Source hide caption

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VEM/Science Source

Leaky Blood Vessels In The Brain May Lead To Alzheimer's

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Tilda the orangutan, relaxing between gabfests at the Cologne Zoo. Cologne Zoo hide caption

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Cologne Zoo

From The Mouths Of Apes, Babble Hints At Origins of Human Speech

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By measuring activity in different parts of the brain, neuroscientsts can get a sense of how some people will respond to treatments. John Lund/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lund/Getty Images

Brain Scans May Help Predict Future Problems, And Solutions

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Barotrauma can cause a fish's eyes to pop out of its head and its stomach to be pushed out of its mouth, according to Chris Lowe, a marine scientist at California State, Long Beach. Jon Hamilton/NPR hide caption

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Jon Hamilton/NPR

How Anglers Are Learning To Save Fish That Get 'The Bends'

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Katie Clapp shares a laugh with her son Andy Tranfaglia, 25, at their home in West Newbury, Mass. Andy has a rare genetic condition called fragile X syndrome. Ellen Webber for NPR hide caption

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Ellen Webber for NPR

A Family's Long Search For Fragile X Drug Finds Frustration, Hope

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Microsoft Co-Founder Gives $100 Million To Research Roots Of Cancer

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Bob Smithson, 79, can now hold his head upright and breathe on his own, thanks to a medication for myasthenia gravis. M. Scott Brauer for NPR hide caption

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M. Scott Brauer for NPR

Medicine's Subtle Art Gives A Man The Chance To Breathe Again

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By increasing the amount of serotonin in the spinal cord, an experimental drug helps nerve connections work better. Bee Smith/Ocean/Corbis hide caption

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Bee Smith/Ocean/Corbis

A Drug Might Heal Spinal Injuries By Sparking Nerve Growth

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In sighted people, the part of the brain that recognizes faces is linked to the brain's visual system. But in blind people it seems wired to circuits that process sound. Tina Zellmer/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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Tina Zellmer/Ikon Images/Corbis

Blind From Birth, But Able To Use Sound To 'See' Faces

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