Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. Currently he focuses on neuroscience, health risks, and extreme weather.
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Jon Hamilton

The Allen Institute for Brain Science hosted its first BigNeuron Hackathon in Beijing earlier this month. Similar events are planned for the U.S. and U.K. Courtesy of Allen Institute for Brain Science hide caption

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Courtesy of Allen Institute for Brain Science

Hackers Teach Computers To Tell Healthy And Sick Brain Cells Apart

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About twice a year, statistics suggest, a pilot somewhere in the world — usually flying alone — deliberately crashes a plane. The Germanwing flight downed last week may be one such case. But most people who fit the psychological profile of the pilots in these very rare events never have problems while flying. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

No Easy, Reliable Way To Screen For Suicide

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A simulation from the Neitz lab of what colorblindness looks like, with normal color vision on the left and red-green colorblindness on the right. Courtesy of Neitz Laboratory hide caption

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Courtesy of Neitz Laboratory

University And Biotech Firm Team Up On Colorblindness Therapy

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When combined with results of other neurological tests, and in the context of a thorough medical history, atrophy of the brain (shown here in an MRI scan) sometimes indicates Alzheimer's. Simon Fraser/Science Source hide caption

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Simon Fraser/Science Source

Many Doctors Who Diagnose Alzheimer's Fail To Tell The Patient

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Jonathan Keleher talks with a colleague, Rafael Wainhaus, at work. Keleher was born without a cerebellum, but his brain has developed work-arounds for solving problems of balance and abstract thought. Ellen Webber for NPR hide caption

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Ellen Webber for NPR

Clues To Autism, Schizophrenia Emerge From Cerebellum Research

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Jonathan Keleher is one of a handful of people who have lived their entire lives without a cerebellum. Ellen Webber for NPR hide caption

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Ellen Webber for NPR

A Man's Incomplete Brain Reveals Cerebellum's Role In Thought And Emotion

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Prion protein can be infectious, spreading from cell to cell in the brain. Here four nerve cells in a mouse illustrate how infectious prion protein moves within cells along neurites — wire-like connections the nerve cells use for communicating with adjacent cells. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Mad Cow Research Hints At Ways To Halt Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

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Why The 'Nightmare Superbug' Isn't As Scary As It Sounds

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Pain Really Is All In Your Head And Emotion Controls Intensity

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Eastman Chemical went a step beyond calling Tritan plastic BPA-free, setting off a legal challenge. Eastman hide caption

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Eastman

Beyond BPA: Court Battle Reveals A Shift In Debate Over Plastic Safety

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Juniper Russo walks her dogs with her daughter Vivian (left). Courtesy of Juniper Russo hide caption

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Courtesy of Juniper Russo

Once A Vaccine Skeptic, This Mom Changed Her Mind

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Leaks in a barrier between blood vessels and brain cells could contribute to the development of Alzheimer's. VEM/Science Source hide caption

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VEM/Science Source

Leaky Blood Vessels In The Brain May Lead To Alzheimer's

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Tilda the orangutan, relaxing between gabfests at the Cologne Zoo. Cologne Zoo hide caption

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Cologne Zoo

From The Mouths Of Apes, Babble Hints At Origins of Human Speech

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By measuring activity in different parts of the brain, neuroscientsts can get a sense of how some people will respond to treatments. John Lund/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lund/Getty Images

Brain Scans May Help Predict Future Problems, And Solutions

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