Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
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Jon Hamilton

Scientists placed two clusters of cultured forebrain cells side by side (each cluster the size of a head of a pin). Within days, the "minibrains" had fused and particular neurons (in green) migrated from the left side to the right side, as subsets of cells do in a real brain. Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University

'Minibrains' In A Dish Shed A Little Light On Autism And Epilepsy

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Small pulses of electricity to the brain have an effect on memory, new research shows. Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/SCIEPRO/Getty Images

Electrical Stimulation To Boost Memory: Maybe It's All In The Timing

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Lisa Zador/Getty Images

A 'Hot Zone' In The Brain May Reveal When, And Even What, We Dream

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Coalition forces fire a Carl Gustaf recoilless rifle during a training exercise in Afghanistan's Helmand province in 2013. Spc. Justin Young/U.S. Department of Defense/DVIDS hide caption

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Spc. Justin Young/U.S. Department of Defense/DVIDS

Do U.S. Troops Risk Brain Injury When They Fire Heavy Weapons?

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Bill Kochevar received an implanted brain-recording and muscle-stimulating system that allowed him to move limbs he hadn't been able to move in eight years. Cleveland FES Center hide caption

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Cleveland FES Center

Paralyzed Man Uses Thoughts To Control His Own Arm And Hand

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Ketamine For Severe Depression: 'How Do You Not Offer This Drug To People?'

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A colored magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain of a 76-year-old patient with dementia shows the brain has atrophied and the dark brown fluid-filled spaces have become enlarged. Zephyr/Science Source hide caption

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Zephyr/Science Source

Cancer Drug That Might Slow Parkinson's, Alzheimer's Headed For Bigger Tests

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Rocky spent his first few years raised by people, and is particularly attuned to human speech and behavior, researchers say. But his remarkable ability to learn and match human pitch and common sounds of speech surprised them. Mark Kaser/Courtesy of Indianapolis Zoo hide caption

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Mark Kaser/Courtesy of Indianapolis Zoo

Orangutan's Vocal Feats Hint At Deeper Roots of Human Speech

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A child with nodding syndrome waits for treatment at an outreach site in Uganda's Pader district. Matthew Kielty for NPR hide caption

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Matthew Kielty for NPR

Scientists May Have Solved The Mystery Of Nodding Syndrome

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Scientists have genetically engineered mice (but not this cute one) to be resistant to the addictive effects of cocaine. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

A Brain Tweak Lets Mice Abstain From Cocaine

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A self-portrait taken by Cajal in his library when he was in his 30s. Courtesy Instituto Cajal del Consjo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid hide caption

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Courtesy Instituto Cajal del Consjo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid

Art Exhibition Celebrates Drawings By The Founder Of Modern Neuroscience

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An overlay of a high-resolution photograph of the Women's March shows crowd density. Red areas are the highest density, followed by orange and yellow. In all the photo suggests about 440,000 people attended the march. Digital Design & Imaging Service hide caption

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Digital Design & Imaging Service

Politics Aside, Counting Crowds Is Tricky

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A mouse with predatory brain circuits switched on is much more likely to attack and kill prey like this cricket. Courtesy of Ivan de Araujo/Cell Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Ivan de Araujo/Cell Press

Flipping A Switch In The Brain Turns Lab Rodents Into Killer Mice

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A child takes a facial recognition test in which he is asked to match the face on the top to one of the faces on the bottom. Jesse Gomez and Kalanit Grill-Spector at the Vision and Perception Neuroscience Lab/Science hide caption

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Jesse Gomez and Kalanit Grill-Spector at the Vision and Perception Neuroscience Lab/Science

Brain Area That Recognizes Faces Gets Busier And Better In Young Adults

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