Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
Jon Hamilton 2010
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Jon Hamilton

These PET scans show the normal distribution of opioid receptors in the human brain. A new study suggests ketamine may activate these receptors, raising concern it could be addictive. Philippe Psaila/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Psaila/Science Source

An image of a rosehip neuron (top) and a connecting pyramidal cell (bottom). Tamas Lab/University of Szeged hide caption

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Tamas Lab/University of Szeged

What Makes A Human Brain Unique? A Newly Discovered Neuron May Be A Clue

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Heavy weapons like this shoulder-launched multipurpose assault weapon deliver a powerful blast to the shooter's head. D. Gonzalez/1st Marine Division hide caption

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D. Gonzalez/1st Marine Division

Heavy Weapons Training May Cause Brain Injuries, But The VA Doesn't Cover It

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Sarah Gonzales for NPR

Marines Who Fired Rocket Launchers Now Worry About Their Brains

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Having more than one child is associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's, research finds, as is starting menstruation earlier in life than average and menopause later. Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images

Hormone Levels Likely Influence A Woman's Risk Of Alzheimer's, But How?

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When the heart pushes too hard, as it does when blood pressure is elevated, it can cause damage that can lead to a stroke, says Dr. Walter Koroshetz. John Rensten/Getty Images hide caption

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John Rensten/Getty Images

Worried About Dementia? You Might Want to Check Your Blood Pressure

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Alan Dambach developed tremors that caused his hands to shake uncontrollably. His condition made it difficult to work on his family's tree farm in Fombell, Pa. Ross Mantle for NPR hide caption

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Ross Mantle for NPR

How Highly Focused Sound Waves Steadied A Farmer's Trembling Hand

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Several circular herpes virus particles are seen near a cell membrane. Roseola herpes virus causes a childhood illness marked by skin rashes and now has been found in brains with Alzheimer's disease. NCI/Science Source hide caption

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NCI/Science Source

Researchers Find Herpes Viruses In Brains Marked By Alzheimer's Disease

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What Might Be Behind The Mystery Health Problems U.S. Diplomats Are Experiencing

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

From Chaos To Calm: A Life Changed By Ketamine

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Marines based in Okinawa, Japan, fire an M136 AT-4 rocket launcher as part of a weapons training exercise on the Kaneohe Bay Range Training Facility, in 2014. Lance Cpl. Matthew Bragg/U.S. Marines/DVIDS hide caption

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Lance Cpl. Matthew Bragg/U.S. Marines/DVIDS

Army 'Leans In' To Protect A Shooter's Brain From Blast Injury

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U.S. Marines fire the Carl Gustav rocket system during live-fire training last October. With each firing, the shooter's brain is exposed to pulses of high pressure air emanating from the explosion that travel faster than the speed of sound. Sgt. Aaron Patterson/3rd Marine Division/DVIDS hide caption

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Sgt. Aaron Patterson/3rd Marine Division/DVIDS

Report To Army Finds Blast From Some Weapons May Put Shooter's Brain At Risk

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Scientists placed two clusters of cultured forebrain cells side by side (each cluster the size of a head of a pin) in the lab. Within days, the minibrains had fused and particular neurons (in green) migrated from the left side to the right side, as groups of cells do in a real brain. Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University

Tiny Lab-Grown 'Brains' Raise Big Ethical Questions

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How do we make sense of all that chatter? Ilana Kohn/Getty Images hide caption

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Ilana Kohn/Getty Images

How People Learned To Recognize Monkey Calls Reveals How We All Make Sense Of Sound

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