Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
Jon Hamilton 2010
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Jon Hamilton

Scientists say pea-size organoids of human brain tissue may offer a way to study the biological beginnings of a wide range of brain conditions, including autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences hide caption

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Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences

After Months In A Dish, Lab-Grown Minibrains Start Making 'Brain Waves'

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Astrocyte cells like these from the brain of a mouse may differ subtly from those in a human brain. David Robertson, ICR/Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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David Robertson, ICR/Science Photo Library/Science Source

Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why Many Drugs Help Mice But Not People

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In 2016, dozens of people associated with the U.S. Embassy in Havana began reporting symptoms of what became known as "Havana syndrome." Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters

Brain Scans Find Differences But No Injury In U.S. Diplomats Who Fell Ill In Cuba

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A federally funded study is testing aerobic exercise as a way to prevent the development of Alzheimer's disease. Stewart Cohen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stewart Cohen/Getty Images

Is Aerobic Exercise The Right Prescription For Staving Off Alzheimer's?

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Researchers are hoping to learn how to effectively convey information about people's risk for developing Alzheimer's disease, a dementia still without a cure. Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images hide caption

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Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images

A Genetic Test That Reveals Alzheimer's Risk Can Be Cathartic Or Distressing

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The squiggly blue lines visible in the neurons are an Alzheimer's biomarker called tau. The brownish clumps are amyloid plaques. Courtesy of the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health hide caption

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Courtesy of the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health

New Markers For Alzheimer's Disease Could Aid Diagnosis And Speed Up Drug Development

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Liv Cannon and her fiancé, Cole Chiumento, considered calling off their wedding because of uncertainty over medical debt from her surgery. "I think about it every time I go to the mailbox," Cannon says. Julia Robinson for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Julia Robinson for Kaiser Health News

A Year After Spinal Surgery, A $94,031 Bill Feels Like A Backbreaker

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An MRI scan of a person listening to music shows brain areas that respond. (This scan wasn't part of the research comparing humans and monkeys.) KUL BHATIA/Kul Bhatia/Science Source hide caption

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KUL BHATIA/Kul Bhatia/Science Source

A Musical Brain May Help Us Understand Language And Appreciate Tchaikovsky

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Chris Nickels for NPR

How The Brain Shapes Pain And Links Ouch With Emotion

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Phil Gutis with his dog, Abe, who died last year. Gutis, who has Alzheimer's, hoped an experimental drug could help preserve his memories. Courtesy of Timothy Weaver hide caption

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Courtesy of Timothy Weaver

After A Big Failure, Scientists And Patients Hunt For A New Type Of Alzheimer's Drug

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Decoded Brain Signals Could Give Voiceless People A Way To Talk

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Ketamine appears to restore faulty connections between brain cells, according to research performed in mice. Kevin Link/Science Source hide caption

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Kevin Link/Science Source

Ketamine May Relieve Depression By Repairing Damaged Brain Circuits

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Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

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Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

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Scientists are questioning the evidence about an alleged attack on diplomats at the U.S. Embassy in Havana. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Doubts Rise About Evidence That U.S. Diplomats In Cuba Were Attacked

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