Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
Jon Hamilton 2010
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Jon Hamilton

At an international meeting, Alzheimer's researchers are assessing what comes next

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Scientists say research into Alzheimer's needs to take a broader view of how the disease affects the brain — whether that's changes in the cortex or the role of inflammation. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Alzheimer's researchers are looking beyond plaques and tangles for new treatments

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Encore: Exotic dancers in Hollywood push for unionization

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Why don't woodpecker brains get damaged from pecking? They're tiny, scientists say

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Frank Stephens testifies at a Congressional hearing in 2017. Global Down Syndrome Foundation hide caption

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Global Down Syndrome Foundation

Scientists look to people with Down syndrome to test Alzheimer's drugs

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Encore: Communication among monkeys could help explain how humans evolved to talk

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The way monkeys communicate could help explain how humans evolved to talk

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US Forces in Afghanistan work with a German Shepherd to inspect a vehicle for explosives. IEDs and other bombs led to brain injuries in service people but appear so far to not increase their risk of CTE. ROMEO GACAD / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ROMEO GACAD / AFP via Getty Images

CTE is rare in brains of deceased service members, study finds

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A drug for HIV appears to reverse a type of memory loss in mice

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Researcher Lee Fisher (left) is working to merge prosthetic limbs with the nervous system. Pat Bayne (right) says a prototype has partially restored her sense of touch: "I know there's no hand there, but I can feel it." T. Betler/UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences hide caption

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T. Betler/UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences

Researchers work to create a sense of touch in prosthetic limbs

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Scientists have discovered that a drug used to treat HIV helps restore a particular kind of memory loss in mice. The results hold promise for humans, too. ROBERT F. BUKATY/AP hide caption

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ROBERT F. BUKATY/AP

A drug for HIV appears to reverse a type of memory loss in mice

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An HIV drug appears to boost memory in mice, study shows

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The memory of aging mice improved when they received a substance found in the spinal fluid of young animals. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

A substance found in young spinal fluid helps old mice remember

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Youthful spinal fluid could help treat Alzheimer's disease, study suggests

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