Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
Jon Hamilton 2010
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Chris Nickels for NPR

How The Brain Shapes Pain And Links Ouch With Emotion

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Phil Gutis with his dog, Abe, who died last year. Gutis, who has Alzheimer's, hoped an experimental drug could help preserve his memories. Courtesy of Timothy Weaver hide caption

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Courtesy of Timothy Weaver

After A Big Failure, Scientists And Patients Hunt For A New Type Of Alzheimer's Drug

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Decoded Brain Signals Could Give Voiceless People A Way To Talk

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Ketamine appears to restore faulty connections between brain cells, according to research performed in mice. Kevin Link/Science Source hide caption

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Kevin Link/Science Source

Ketamine May Relieve Depression By Repairing Damaged Brain Circuits

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Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

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Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

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Scientists are questioning the evidence about an alleged attack on diplomats at the U.S. Embassy in Havana. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Doubts Rise About Evidence That U.S. Diplomats In Cuba Were Attacked

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Various forms of dementia can take very different courses, so it's important to get the right diagnosis. Mehau Kulyk/Science Source hide caption

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Mehau Kulyk/Science Source

Is It Alzheimer's Or Another Dementia? The Right Answer Matters

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Spravato, the brand name for esketamine, a newly approved option for treatment-resistant depression. Janssen Pharmaceutica hide caption

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Janssen Pharmaceutica

FDA Approves Esketamine Nasal Spray For Hard-To-Treat Depression

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A screening test for signs of Alzheimer's disease takes only a few minutes, but many doctors don't perform one during older people's annual wellness visits. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Alzheimer's Screenings Often Left Out Of Seniors' Wellness Exams

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FDA Expected To Approve Esketamine Nasal Spray For Depression

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Person undergoing a CAT scan in hospital with PET scan equipment. Emerging studies report findings of brain deterioration in females to be slower than that of males'. Johnny Greig/Getty Images hide caption

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Johnny Greig/Getty Images

Scans Show Female Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down

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Ariel Davis for NPR

From Fruit Fly To Stink Eye: Searching For Anger's Animal Roots

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Cleanup workers rake oil-soaked hay along a Santa Barbara beach in 1969, after an oil spill that was then the largest in U.S. history. Bettmann/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann/Getty Images

How California's Worst Oil Spill Turned Beaches Black And The Nation Green

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A colorized image of a brain cell from an Alzheimer's patient shows a neurofibrillary tangle (red) inside the cytoplasm (yellow) of the cell. The tangles consist primarily of a protein called tau. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Alzheimer's Disease May Develop Differently In African-Americans, Study Suggests

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Researchers say human brains can become overwhelmed by cute traits, such as large eyes and small noses, embodied by movie characters like Bambi. Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images hide caption

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Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images

When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive

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