Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. Currently he focuses on neuroscience, health risks, and extreme weather.
Doby Photography/NPR
Jon Hamilton 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Jon Hamilton

Correspondent, Science Desk

Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. Currently he focuses on neuroscience, health risks, and extreme weather.

Following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, Hamilton was part of NPR's team of science reporters and editors who went to Japan to cover the crisis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

Hamilton contributed several pieces to the Science Desk series "The Human Edge," which looked at what makes people the most versatile and powerful species on Earth. His reporting explained how humans use stories, how the highly evolved human brain is made from primitive parts, and what autism reveals about humans social brains.

In 2009, Hamilton received the Michael E. DeBakey Journalism Award for his piece on the neuroscience behind treating autism.

Before joining NPR in 1998, Hamilton was a media fellow with the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation studying health policy issues. He reported on states that have improved their Medicaid programs for the poor by enrolling beneficiaries in private HMOs.

From 1995-1997, Hamilton wrote on health and medical topics as a freelance writer, after having been a medical reporter for both The Commercial Appeal and Physician's Weekly.

Hamilton graduated with honors from Oberlin College in Ohio with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English. As a student, he was the editor of the Oberlin Review student newspaper. He earned his master's degree in journalism from Columbia University, where he graduated with honors During his time at Columbia, Hamilton was awarded the Baker Prize for magazine writing and earned a Sherwood traveling fellowship.

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Story Archive

This light micrograph of a part of a brain affected by Alzheimer's disease shows an accumulation of darkened plaques, which have molecules called amyloid-beta at their core. Once dismissed as all bad, amyloid-beta might actually be a useful part of the immune system, some scientists now suspect — until the brain starts making too much. Martin M. Rotker/Science Source hide caption

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Martin M. Rotker/Science Source

Brain MRI BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images

A Tiny Pulse Of Electricity Can Help The Brain Form Lasting Memories

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Her Seizures Looked Like Epilepsy, But Her Brain Looked Fine

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Scientists zeroed in on specific neurons in the brains of mice to gain insights into how anxiety is triggered and suppressed. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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Researchers Discover 'Anxiety Cells' In The Brain

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(Left to right) Donald Trump, Abraham Lincoln and then vice presidential-candidate Richard Nixon (Left to right) Drew Angerer/Getty Images; National Archive/Getty Images; Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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(Left to right) Drew Angerer/Getty Images; National Archive/Getty Images; Keystone/Getty Images

Why Mental Health Is A Poor Measure Of A President

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As people age they may forget more because their brain waves get out of sync, new research finds. PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images hide caption

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Older Adults' Forgetfulness Tied To Faulty Brain Rhythms In Sleep

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How Scientists Are Growing Mini Brains In Petri Dishes For Experiments

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I guess it's too late to change my mind. Aşkın Dursun KAMBEROĞLU/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Your Brain Has Trouble Bailing Out Of A Bad Plan

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New Drugs Could Prevent Migraine Headaches For Some People

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Encore: Blue Light And Sleep

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If you're regularly checking your phone at night in a dark room, you're probably tricking your body into thinking it's still daytime. Artur Debat/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Apps Can Cut Blue Light From Devices, But Do They Help You Sleep?

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Brain Scientists Look Beyond Opioids To Conquer Pain

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In D.C., Brain Science Meets Behavioral Science To Shed Light On Mental Disorders

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Sleepless Night Leaves Some Brain Cells As Sluggish As You Feel

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Brain Patterns May Predict People At Risk Of Suicide

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