Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
Jon Hamilton 2010
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Jon Hamilton

Doby Photography/NPR
Jon Hamilton 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Jon Hamilton

Correspondent, Science Desk

Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. Currently he focuses on neuroscience and health risks.

In 2014, Hamilton went to Liberia as part of the NPR team that covered Ebola. The team received a Peabody Award for its coverage.

Following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, Hamilton was part of NPR's team of science reporters and editors who went to Japan to cover the crisis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

Hamilton contributed several pieces to the Science Desk series "The Human Edge," which looked at what makes people the most versatile and powerful species on Earth. His reporting explained how humans use stories, how the highly evolved human brain is made from primitive parts, and what autism reveals about humans' social brains.

In 2009, Hamilton received the Michael E. DeBakey Journalism Award for his piece on the neuroscience behind treating autism.

Before joining NPR in 1998, Hamilton was a media fellow with the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation studying health policy issues. He reported on states that have improved their Medicaid programs for the poor by enrolling beneficiaries in private HMOs.

From 1995-1997, Hamilton wrote on health and medical topics as a freelance writer, after having been a medical reporter for both The Commercial Appeal and Physician's Weekly.

Hamilton graduated with honors from Oberlin College in Ohio with a Bachelor of Arts in English. As a student, he was the editor of the Oberlin Review student newspaper. He earned his master's degree in journalism from Columbia University, where he graduated with honors. During his time at Columbia, Hamilton was awarded the Baker Prize for magazine writing and earned a Sherwood traveling fellowship.

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Yalonda M. James/San Francisco Chronicle/Hearst Newspapers

The Resurgence Of Psychedelic Psychiatry

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Inside Lola ya Bonobo Sanctuary's Efforts To Save One Of The World's Greatest Apes

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A study of mice that hear imaginary sounds could help explain human disorders like schizophrenia, which produce hallucinations. D-Keine/Getty Images hide caption

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D-Keine/Getty Images

Mice That Hear Imaginary Sounds May Help Explain Hallucinations In People

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Bonobos Offer Clues To Why Humans Evolved To Value Niceness

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Dr. Hansel Tookes made sure his first dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami on Dec. 15. was televised, as a way to combat hesitancy. Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

More Black And Latinx Americans Are Embracing COVID-19 Vaccination

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Yvonne Vela Tona, one of the "mamas" at the sanctuary, looks after the young bonobo Esake. Ley Uwera for NPR hide caption

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Ley Uwera for NPR

Some Generous Apes May Help Explain The Evolution Of Human Kindness

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Friday marked the busiest day for the nation's airports since the start of the pandemic in March 2020. Above, a passenger wears a face mask as he waits for a Delta Airlines flight at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta on Feb. 18, 2021. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP
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As a researcher at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle, Alice Mukora says she understands the need to enroll diverse populations in Alzheimer's research. But that would be more likely to happen, she notes, if people of color had better experiences getting Alzheimer's care. Siri Stafford/Getty Images hide caption

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Siri Stafford/Getty Images

'Providers Don't Even Listen': Barriers To Alzheimer's Care When You're Not White

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University of California, San Diego scientist Alysson Muotri's lab grew brain organoids from human stem cells that swapped a developmental gene from Neanderthals for the human version. Muotri Lab/UC San Diego hide caption

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Muotri Lab/UC San Diego

'Minibrains' With A Neanderthal Gene Offer Hints About Human Evolution

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What A Brain Organoid Grown With Neanderthal DNA Tells Us About Modern Humans

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A bonobo family munches on leaves at Lola la Bonobo sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Ley Uwera for NPR hide caption

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How Bonobos Help Explain The Evolution Of Nice

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A pair of studies suggest that a customized approach to brain stimulation carries advantages in treating mental health conditions. Yuichiro Chino/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuichiro Chino/Getty Images

Studies Suggest Benefits From A Personalized Approach To Brain Stimulation

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