Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
Jon Hamilton 2010
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Jon Hamilton

Doby Photography/NPR
Jon Hamilton 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Jon Hamilton

Correspondent, Science Desk

Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. Currently he focuses on neuroscience and health risks.

In 2014, Hamilton went to Liberia as part of the NPR team that covered Ebola. The team received a Peabody Award for its coverage.

Following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, Hamilton was part of NPR's team of science reporters and editors who went to Japan to cover the crisis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

Hamilton contributed several pieces to the Science Desk series "The Human Edge," which looked at what makes people the most versatile and powerful species on Earth. His reporting explained how humans use stories, how the highly evolved human brain is made from primitive parts, and what autism reveals about humans' social brains.

In 2009, Hamilton received the Michael E. DeBakey Journalism Award for his piece on the neuroscience behind treating autism.

Before joining NPR in 1998, Hamilton was a media fellow with the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation studying health policy issues. He reported on states that have improved their Medicaid programs for the poor by enrolling beneficiaries in private HMOs.

From 1995-1997, Hamilton wrote on health and medical topics as a freelance writer, after having been a medical reporter for both The Commercial Appeal and Physician's Weekly.

Hamilton graduated with honors from Oberlin College in Ohio with a Bachelor of Arts in English. As a student, he was the editor of the Oberlin Review student newspaper. He earned his master's degree in journalism from Columbia University, where he graduated with honors. During his time at Columbia, Hamilton was awarded the Baker Prize for magazine writing and earned a Sherwood traveling fellowship.

Story Archive

Sake, a three year old Bonobo at the Lola's Sanctuary. Ley Uwera for NPR hide caption

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Ley Uwera for NPR

Bonobos and the evolution of nice

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Scientists at the Allen Institute for Brain Science uncovered differences among human brain cells (left) those of the marmoset monkey (middle) and mouse in a brain region that controls movement, the primary motor cortex. Allen Institute for Brain Science hide caption

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Allen Institute for Brain Science

New brain maps could help the search for Alzheimer's treatments

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Nobel Prize awarded to U.S. scientists for research on how we sense of heat and touch

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Ben Elliott gets barreled at the BSR Surf Resort, where artificial waves are attracting world-class talent. Rob Henson/BSR Surf Resort hide caption

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Rob Henson/BSR Surf Resort

The Surf's Always Up — In Waco, Texas

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Everyday tasks — such as buttoning a shirt, opening a jar or brushing teeth — can suddenly seem impossible after a stroke that affects the brain's fine motor control of the hands. New research suggests starting intensive rehab a bit later than typically happens now — and continuing it longer — might improve recovery. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

The Best Time For Rehabilitation After A Stroke Might Actually Be 2 To 3 Months Later

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Various types of pufferfish are among those served as the gastronomic delicacy fugu. The paralyzing nerve toxin some of these fish contain is also under study by brain scientists hunting new ways to treat amblyopia. shan.shihan/Getty Images hide caption

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shan.shihan/Getty Images

Pufferfish Toxin Holds Clues To Treating 'Lazy Eye' In Adults

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Ben Elliott gets barreled at the BSR Surf Resort, where artificial waves are attracting world-class talent. Rob Henson/BSR Surf Resort hide caption

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Rob Henson/BSR Surf Resort

Surfers Are Trading Natural Waves For Artificial Ones In Waco, Texas

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Waco, Texas, Has Become An Unlikely Destination For Surfers. Why?

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Scientists are working to develop new treatments for Alzheimer's disease by looking beyond amyloid plaques, which have been the focus of most Alzheimer's drug development in the past 20 years. Science Photo Library — ZEPHYR./Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library — ZEPHYR./Getty Images

Future Alzheimer's Treatments Aim To Do More Than Clear Plaques From The Brain

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Among the topics discussed at the 2021 Alzheimer's Association International Conference were how doctors should think about prescribing the new drug Aduhelm and how COVID may affect the brain long-term. The Alzheimer's Association hide caption

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The Alzheimer's Association

As part of a clinical study, a patient with Alzheimer's disease receives an infusion of aducanumab at a Providence, R.I., hospital in 2019. Aducanumab is being marketed as Aduhelm. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

A New Alzheimer's Drug Comes With Lots Of Questions About How To Use It

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Medical Experts Are Still Figuring Out How To Use Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

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Medical staff members check on a patient in the COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston last November. Doctors are now investigating whether people with lingering cognitive symptoms may be at risk for dementia. Go Nakamura/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Go Nakamura/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Doctors Worry That Memory Problems After COVID-19 May Set The Stage For Alzheimer's

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UCSF neurosurgeon Edward Chang says a system that lets a man express his thoughts at 15 words a minute is just the beginning for computer-mediated communication. Barbara Ries/UCSF hide caption

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Barbara Ries/UCSF

Experimental Brain Implant Lets Man With Paralysis Turn His Thoughts Into Words

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A doctor reviews a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix. The drug company Biogen Inc. says it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease. The announcement was a surprise because the company stopped two studies of aducanumab in 2019 after partial results suggested it was not working. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

FDA Approves Aducanumab — A Controversial Drug For Alzheimer's

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