Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
Jon Hamilton 2010
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Jon Hamilton

Doby Photography/NPR
Jon Hamilton 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Jon Hamilton

Correspondent, Science Desk

Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. Currently he focuses on neuroscience and health risks.

In 2014, Hamilton went to Liberia as part of the NPR team that covered Ebola. The team received a Peabody Award for its coverage.

Following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, Hamilton was part of NPR's team of science reporters and editors who went to Japan to cover the crisis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

Hamilton contributed several pieces to the Science Desk series "The Human Edge," which looked at what makes people the most versatile and powerful species on Earth. His reporting explained how humans use stories, how the highly evolved human brain is made from primitive parts, and what autism reveals about humans' social brains.

In 2009, Hamilton received the Michael E. DeBakey Journalism Award for his piece on the neuroscience behind treating autism.

Before joining NPR in 1998, Hamilton was a media fellow with the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation studying health policy issues. He reported on states that have improved their Medicaid programs for the poor by enrolling beneficiaries in private HMOs.

From 1995-1997, Hamilton wrote on health and medical topics as a freelance writer, after having been a medical reporter for both The Commercial Appeal and Physician's Weekly.

Hamilton graduated with honors from Oberlin College in Ohio with a Bachelor of Arts in English. As a student, he was the editor of the Oberlin Review student newspaper. He earned his master's degree in journalism from Columbia University, where he graduated with honors. During his time at Columbia, Hamilton was awarded the Baker Prize for magazine writing and earned a Sherwood traveling fellowship.

Story Archive

An experimental Alzheimer's drug could be approved next year. But it comes with risks

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An experimental drug appears to slow memory loss in people with early Alzheimer's

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This illustration made available by the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health depicts cells in an Alzheimer's-affected brain. An experimental drug modestly slowed the brain disease's progression, researchers reported Tuesday. NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING, NIH/AP hide caption

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NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING, NIH/AP

NIH Director Francis Collins and Renée Fleming, who is Artistic Advisor at Large for the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., sing a duet. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

Arts Week: How Art Can Heal The Brain

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Over 23,000 brain scientists gathered in San Diego for a conference last week

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Depression and Alzheimer's are relatively common and the subject of a lot of research. Cemile Bingol / Getty Images hide caption

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Cemile Bingol / Getty Images

Depression And Alzheimer's Treatments At A Crossroads

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A doctor points to PET scan results that are part of Alzheimer's disease research. Much work in the field focuses a substance called beta-amyloid. A new study could test whether that's the right target. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

What causes Alzheimer's? Study puts leading theory to 'ultimate test'

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After a dose of ketamine, special video games that offered a depressed player positive feedback, in the form of smiling faces or encouraging words, seemed to boost the length of time the drug quelled depression. akinbostanci/Getty Images hide caption

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akinbostanci/Getty Images

Smiling faces might help the drug ketamine keep depression at bay

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A dish full of brain cells has learned to play the computer game Pong

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This cross-section of a rat brain shows tissue from a human brain organoid fluorescing in light green. Scientists say these implanted clusters of human neurons could aid the study of brain disorders. Pasca lab / Stanford Medicine hide caption

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Pasca lab / Stanford Medicine

Human cells in a rat's brain could shed light on autism and ADHD

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LSD blotter tabs sit on top of a US quarter coin. A drug based off of psychedelic LSD appears to relieve depression and anxiety in mice, but without the hallucinogenic side effects. PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP via Getty Images

People participate in one last ice bucket challenge during the last annual "Plunge 4 Pete" on what would have been Pete Frates 35th birthday on Dec. 28, 2019 in Gloucester, MA. Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images

A drug based on LSD appears to treat depression in mice without the psychedelic trip

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A controversial new drug for ALS that just received FDA approval could add months to patients' lives, but some scientists question whether it actually works. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

ALS drug's approval draws cheers from patients, questions from skeptics

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