Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
Jon Hamilton 2010
Stories By

Jon Hamilton

Doby Photography/NPR
Jon Hamilton 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Jon Hamilton

Correspondent, Science Desk

Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. Currently he focuses on neuroscience and health risks.

In 2014, Hamilton went to Liberia as part of the NPR team that covered Ebola. The team received a Peabody Award for its coverage.

Following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, Hamilton was part of NPR's team of science reporters and editors who went to Japan to cover the crisis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

Hamilton contributed several pieces to the Science Desk series "The Human Edge," which looked at what makes people the most versatile and powerful species on Earth. His reporting explained how humans use stories, how the highly evolved human brain is made from primitive parts, and what autism reveals about humans' social brains.

In 2009, Hamilton received the Michael E. DeBakey Journalism Award for his piece on the neuroscience behind treating autism.

Before joining NPR in 1998, Hamilton was a media fellow with the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation studying health policy issues. He reported on states that have improved their Medicaid programs for the poor by enrolling beneficiaries in private HMOs.

From 1995-1997, Hamilton wrote on health and medical topics as a freelance writer, after having been a medical reporter for both The Commercial Appeal and Physician's Weekly.

Hamilton graduated with honors from Oberlin College in Ohio with a Bachelor of Arts in English. As a student, he was the editor of the Oberlin Review student newspaper. He earned his master's degree in journalism from Columbia University, where he graduated with honors. During his time at Columbia, Hamilton was awarded the Baker Prize for magazine writing and earned a Sherwood traveling fellowship.

Story Archive

Saturday

A new study casts doubt on oxytocin's role as a 'love hormone'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1152313319/1152313320" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

Prairie voles mate for life and are frequently used to study human behavior. Todd H. Ahern/Emory University hide caption

toggle caption
Todd H. Ahern/Emory University

Can you bond without the 'love hormone'? These cuddly rodents show it's possible

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1152009605/1152140625" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

The ROSA machine allows surgeons to zero in on areas of the brain tied to seizures, and guides a surgical arm precisely to the target. University of California, San Diego hide caption

toggle caption
University of California, San Diego

Monday

The FDA approves an Alzheimer's drug that appears to modestly slow the disease

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1147787278/1147787279" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

U.S. health officials approved Leqembi, a new Alzheimer's drug that modestly slows the brain disease. The FDA granted accelerated approval Friday for patients in early stages of Alzheimer's. David Duprey/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Duprey/AP

FDA approves Alzheimer's drug that appears to modestly slow disease

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1147513068/1147691175" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

Time cells place a kind of time stamp on an unfolding experience, but sequence is more important than the moment. Carol Yepes/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Carol Yepes/Getty Images

Tuesday

A Washington, D.C., resident has an operation growing psilocybin mushrooms. Brain researchers are increasingly studying psychedelic compounds like psilocybin and LSD as potential treatments for anxiety, depression and other disorders. Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Psychedelic drugs may launch a new era in psychiatric treatment, brain scientists say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1145306096/1145546384" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

The active chemical in psylocibe cubensis (the "magic mushrooms" shown here) is being studied closely for its potential therapeutic benefits. labuda/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
labuda/Getty Images

Brain Scientists Are Tripping Out Over Psychedelics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1144306776/1144525546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images

For 'time cells' in the brain, what matters is what happens in the moment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139780745/1144821817" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saturday

Encore: Is lecanemab the Alzheimer's drug that will finally make a difference?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1142074794/1142074795" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

In a large study, experimental drug lecanemab was able to slow down Alzheimer's, but not stop it. Some researchers think the drug will become the first to help many patients; others have questions. Cemile Bingol/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cemile Bingol/Getty Images

Is lecanemab the Alzheimer's drug that will finally make a difference?

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1141396375/1141414401" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tuesday

An experimental Alzheimer's drug could be approved next year. But it comes with risks

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1140894394/1140894395" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

An experimental drug appears to slow memory loss in people with early Alzheimer's

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139975974/1139975975" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This illustration made available by the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health depicts cells in an Alzheimer's-affected brain. An experimental drug modestly slowed the brain disease's progression, researchers reported Tuesday. NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING, NIH/AP hide caption

toggle caption
NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING, NIH/AP

Tuesday

NIH Director Francis Collins and Renée Fleming, who is Artistic Advisor at Large for the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., sing a duet. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Shelby Knowles/NPR

Arts Week: How Art Can Heal The Brain

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1135906604/1138828613" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">