Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
Jon Hamilton 2010
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Jon Hamilton

Doby Photography/NPR
Jon Hamilton 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Jon Hamilton

Correspondent, Science Desk

Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. Currently he focuses on neuroscience and health risks.

In 2014, Hamilton went to Liberia as part of the NPR team that covered Ebola. The team received a Peabody Award for its coverage.

Following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, Hamilton was part of NPR's team of science reporters and editors who went to Japan to cover the crisis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

Hamilton contributed several pieces to the Science Desk series "The Human Edge," which looked at what makes people the most versatile and powerful species on Earth. His reporting explained how humans use stories, how the highly evolved human brain is made from primitive parts, and what autism reveals about humans' social brains.

In 2009, Hamilton received the Michael E. DeBakey Journalism Award for his piece on the neuroscience behind treating autism.

Before joining NPR in 1998, Hamilton was a media fellow with the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation studying health policy issues. He reported on states that have improved their Medicaid programs for the poor by enrolling beneficiaries in private HMOs.

From 1995-1997, Hamilton wrote on health and medical topics as a freelance writer, after having been a medical reporter for both The Commercial Appeal and Physician's Weekly.

Hamilton graduated with honors from Oberlin College in Ohio with a Bachelor of Arts in English. As a student, he was the editor of the Oberlin Review student newspaper. He earned his master's degree in journalism from Columbia University, where he graduated with honors. During his time at Columbia, Hamilton was awarded the Baker Prize for magazine writing and earned a Sherwood traveling fellowship.

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The brain analyzes changes in sound volume to detect syllables and make sense of speech. filo/Getty Images hide caption

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filo/Getty Images

The Loudness Of Vowels Helps The Brain Break Down Speech Into Syl-La-Bles

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When It Comes To Vaping, Health Officials Insist There's A Lot At Stake

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Former President Jimmy Carter had surgery Tuesday to relieve pressure on his brain. He's seen here earlier this month, teaching Sunday school at his church in Plains, Ga. John Amis/AP hide caption

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John Amis/AP

Jimmy Carter Surgery: 'No Complications' In Bid To Relieve Pressure On His Brain

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New Study Challenges The Assumption That Math Is Harder For Girls

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Two fourth-graders rock side to side while doing math equations at Charles Pinckney Elementary School's "Brain Room" in Charleston, S.C., in 2015. John McDonnell/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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John McDonnell/The Washington Post/Getty Images

During deep sleep, waves of cerebrospinal fluid (blue) coincide with temporary decreases in blood flow (red). Less blood in the brain means more room for the fluid to carry away toxins, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease. Fultz et al. 2019 hide caption

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Fultz et al. 2019

How Deep Sleep May Help The Brain Clear Alzheimer's Toxins

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At Chicago's McCormick Place, neuroscientists from around the world presented their work to colleagues. But some researchers were denied entry because of the Trump administration's travel ban. Rob Piercy/Allen Institute hide caption

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Rob Piercy/Allen Institute

U.S. Travel Ban Disrupts The World's Largest Brain Science Meeting

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A PET scan shows metabolism of sugar in the human brain. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Keeping Your Blood Sugar In Check Could Lower Your Alzheimer's Risk

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Low Blood Sugar Levels May Keep Alzheimer's At Bay

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The University of Iowa is working to include teens on the autism spectrum in its programs for gifted students. Jeremy Leung for NPR hide caption

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Jeremy Leung for NPR

Gifted Teens With Autism Connect With Like-Minded Kids At Math And Science Camp

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How does nicotine in e-cigarettes affect young brains? Researchers are teasing out answers. Research on young mice and rats shows how nicotine hijacks brain systems involved in learning, memory, impulse control and addiction. Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How Vaping Nicotine Can Affect A Teenage Brain

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Triathletes who trained too much chose immediate gratification over long-term rewards, researchers found. Markus Büsges/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Too Much Training Can Tax Athletes' Brains

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A colored computerized tomography (CT) scan of an axial section of the brain of a 59-year-old patient with a malignant (cancerous) glioblastoma brain tumor. Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Science Source

Deadly Brain Cancers Act Like 'Vampires' By Hijacking Normal Cells To Grow

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