Jon Hamilton Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
Jon Hamilton 2010
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Jon Hamilton

Doby Photography/NPR
Jon Hamilton 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Jon Hamilton

Correspondent, Science Desk

Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. Currently he focuses on neuroscience and health risks.

In 2014, Hamilton went to Liberia as part of the NPR team that covered Ebola. The team received a Peabody Award for its coverage.

Following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, Hamilton was part of NPR's team of science reporters and editors who went to Japan to cover the crisis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

Hamilton contributed several pieces to the Science Desk series "The Human Edge," which looked at what makes people the most versatile and powerful species on Earth. His reporting explained how humans use stories, how the highly evolved human brain is made from primitive parts, and what autism reveals about humans' social brains.

In 2009, Hamilton received the Michael E. DeBakey Journalism Award for his piece on the neuroscience behind treating autism.

Before joining NPR in 1998, Hamilton was a media fellow with the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation studying health policy issues. He reported on states that have improved their Medicaid programs for the poor by enrolling beneficiaries in private HMOs.

From 1995-1997, Hamilton wrote on health and medical topics as a freelance writer, after having been a medical reporter for both The Commercial Appeal and Physician's Weekly.

Hamilton graduated with honors from Oberlin College in Ohio with a Bachelor of Arts in English. As a student, he was the editor of the Oberlin Review student newspaper. He earned his master's degree in journalism from Columbia University, where he graduated with honors. During his time at Columbia, Hamilton was awarded the Baker Prize for magazine writing and earned a Sherwood traveling fellowship.

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Portrait of Phillip Lyn taken by his spouse, Kurt Rehwinkel, outside their home in St. Louis. Kurt Rehwinkel hide caption

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Kurt Rehwinkel

For Those Facing Alzheimer's, A Controversial Drug Offers Hope

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Mark Forrest is back fishing after rehabilitation with the IpsiHand device helped him regain use of his right hand. Mark Forrest hide caption

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Mark Forrest

New Device Taps Brain Signals To Help Stroke Patients Regain Hand Function

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New Controversial Alzheimer's Drug Provides Hope, Says Patient

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FDA Approves A Controversial Drug To Treat Alzheimer's Disease

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Dr. William Burke goes over a PET brain scan in 2018 at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix. The drug company Biogen has received federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

The FDA Has Approved A New Alzheimer's Drug — Here's Why That's Controversial

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Dr. William Burke reviews a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix in 2018. An experimental Alzheimer's drug from Biogen and Eisai is on the verge of a Food and Drug Administration decision. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

FDA Poised For Decision On Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

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FDA Mulls Over Approval Of Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

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President Barack Obama, left, shakes hands with Nathan Copeland, right, in 2016. Copeland demonstrates how he can control a robotic arm and feel when the robotic hand is touched. Dr. Jennifer Collinger, one of Copeland's doctors, watches, center. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

FDA-Approved Device Will Help Stroke Victims Regain Use Of Hands

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President Barack Obama bumped fists with Nathan Copeland during a tour of innovation projects at the White House Frontiers Conference at the University of Pittsburgh in 2016. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Scientists Bring The Sense Of Touch To A Robotic Arm

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New Brain-Controlled Robotic Arm Gives Wearer The Sense Of Touch

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A man who is paralyzed was able to type with 95% accuracy by imagining that he was handwriting letters on a sheet of paper, a team reported in the journal Nature. Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images hide caption

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Man Who Is Paralyzed Communicates By Imagining Handwriting

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Fragile X syndrome involves changes in the X chromosome, as pictured in the four columns of chromosomes starting on the left. The fifth column, on the far right, shows two normal X chromosomes. RICHARD J. GREEN/ScienceSource hide caption

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RICHARD J. GREEN/ScienceSource

Artist William Stoehr says he wants his portraits to show that addiction affects everyone, and to prompt the sort of conversations that people began having about HIV/AIDS decades ago. William Stoehr hide caption

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William Stoehr

An Artist And A Scientist Take On The Stigma Of Addiction

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Fragile X syndrome involves changes in the X chromosome, as pictured in the four columns of chromosomes starting on the left. The fifth column, on the far right, shows two normal X chromosomes. Richard J. Green/Science Source hide caption

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Richard J. Green/Science Source

An Alzheimer's Drug May Boost Cognition In People With Fragile X Syndrome

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