Richard Harris Award-winning journalist Richard Harris reports on biomedical research for NPR's newsmagazines, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.
Richard Harris 2010
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Richard Harris

CDC: Fully Vaccinated People Can Stop Wearing Masks Indoors, Outdoors

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In an update on COVID-19 Wednesday, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer discussed the state's efforts to expand the use of monoclonal antibody therapy to help those diagnosed with COVID-19 avoid hospitalization. Michigan Office of the Governor/AP hide caption

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Michigan Office of the Governor/AP

Antibody Drugs For COVID-19 Are A Cumbersome Tool Against Surges

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'Monoclonal Antibodies' Can Keep Coronavirus In Check, But Won't Stem Michigan Surge

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Deaths from COVID-19 are often due to the immune system overreacting to the coronavirus. New drugs to suppress that reaction are showing promise, say researchers. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Drugs Targeting Immune Response To COVID-19 Show Promise

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Sonia Sein with her surgeons and ICU team at The Mount Sinai Hospital. Claudia Paul/Mount Sinai Health System hide caption

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Claudia Paul/Mount Sinai Health System

Woman Gets New Windpipe In Groundbreaking Transplant Surgery

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Drugs Targeting Immune Response To COVID-19 Show Promise

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Bad Batch Of Johnson & Johnson Vaccines Sets Back Production

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Vaccinated College Students Will Help Answer Critical Question About COVID Spread

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AstraZeneca's Latest Report Supports Effectiveness Of COVID-19 Vaccine

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Early on in the COVID-19 pandemic antibiotics were frequently prescribed to seriously ill patients, even though the disease is caused by a virus. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Antibiotic Use Ran High In Early Days Of COVID-19, Despite Viral Cause

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Melissa Cruz elevates her arm after donating COVID-19 convalescent plasma in April 2020 as phlebotomist Jenee Wilson shuts down the collection equipment at Bloodworks Northwest in Seattle. Karen Ducey/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Convalescent Plasma Strikes Out As COVID-19 Treatment

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A health care worker draws a dose of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine into a syringe for an immunization event in the parking lot of the L.A. Mission on Feb. 24. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Could A Single-Dose Of COVID-19 Vaccine After Illness Stretch The Supply?

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Sepsis, which is sometimes called blood poisoning, is essentially the body's overreaction to an infection. Kateryna Kon/Science Source hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Science Source

Vitamin C Fails Again As Treatment For Sepsis

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Vitamin C Apparently Not Useful For Sepsis After All

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