Richard Harris Award-winning journalist Richard Harris reports on biomedical research for NPR's newsmagazines, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.
Richard Harris 2010
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Richard Harris

Orangutans can get exercise and look down their noses at zoo visitors, thanks to cables that stretch from one side of the primate habitat to the other. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

A lone emperor penguin makes his rounds, at the edge of an iceberg drift in the Antarctic's Ross Sea in 2006. John Weller/AP hide caption

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John Weller/AP

Fuel Efficiency Standards Live On After 1973 Oil Embargo

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On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Richard Harris discussed the latest report on climate change

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An iceberg floats through the water in Ilulissat, Greenland, in July. Researchers are studying how climate change and melting glaciers will affect the rest of the world. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A rig drills a hydraulic fracturing well for natural gas outside Rifle, Colo., in March. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Natural Gas May Be Easier On Climate Than Coal, Despite Methane Leaks

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The surface tower at a drill site, under construction during blistering Antarctic winds. Data from instruments, deployed through 450 meters of ice, is transmitted from the tower by satellite back to the Naval Postgraduate School. Image courtesy of Tim Stanton hide caption

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Image courtesy of Tim Stanton

Remote Antarctic Trek Reveals A Glacier Melting From Below

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This artist's illustration shows the Voyager 1 space probe. The spacecraft was launched on Sept. 5, 1977, and as of August 2012, it is outside the bubble of hot gas, known as the "heliopause," that radiates from the sun. NASA/Landov hide caption

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NASA/Landov

See Ya, Voyager: Probe Has Finally Entered Interstellar Space

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