Richard Harris Award-winning journalist Richard Harris reports on biomedical research for NPR's newsmagazines, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Mine Cicek, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic, processes samples for the All of Us program. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Researchers Gather Health Data For 'All Of Us'

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Careful custody of blood tests and tissue samples is essential to the success of precision medicine. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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Precision Medical Treatments Have A Quality Control Problem

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Volunteer Greg Ruegsegger is outfitted with monitors, a catheter threaded into a vein and a mask to capture his breath in an experiment run by Joyner to measure human performance. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Will Gathering Vast Troves of Information Really Lead To Better Health?

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Bacterial cells can now read a synthetic genetic code and use it to assemble proteins containing man-made parts. Gary Bates/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Train Bacteria To Build Unnatural Proteins

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Emily Blair, a medical assistant at the Colon, Stomach and Liver Center in Lansdowne, Va., takes a blood pressure reading for Robert Koenen. New guidelines say that patients should have their arm resting on a surface while taking a reading and both feet should be placed flat on the ground. Josh Loock/NPR hide caption

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Odds Are, They're Taking Your Blood Pressure All Wrong

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Researchers grew sheets of genetically altered skin cells in the lab and used them to treat a boy with life-threatening epidermolysis bullosa. CMR Unimore/Nature hide caption

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Genetically Altered Skin Saves A Boy Dying Of A Rare Disease

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A study of chemotherapy medicines produced by 10 companies found that, on average, each drug produced seven times as much revenue for its manufacturer as it cost in research and development. BrianAJackson/iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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R&D Costs For Cancer Drugs Are Likely Much Less Than Industry Claims, Study Finds

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Arthritis is a joint disease that can cause cartilage destruction and erosion of the bone, as well as tendon inflammation and rupture. Affected areas are highlighted in red in this enhanced X-ray. Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source

6,000-Year-Old Knee Joints Suggest Osteoarthritis Isn't Just Wear And Tear

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A vaccine against heroin wouldn't be like the measles vaccine that you receive once for a lifetime of immunity, say scientists working on it. Multiple shots per year would likely be required, and it would be specific to just heroin and morphine. kimberrywood/Getty Images hide caption

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A 'Vaccine For Addiction' Is No Simple Fix

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Scientists Are Not So Hot At Predicting Which Cancer Studies Will Succeed

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Michelle Flandez's son Inti Perez — pictured at home in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, in 2016 — was born with microcephaly linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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A 4-year-old regulation in New York state requires doctors and hospitals to treat sepsis using a protocol that some researchers now question. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Are State Rules For Treating Sepsis Really Saving Lives?

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Turns out humans are better at smelling than you might think. CSA Images/ Color Printstock Col/Vetta/Getty Images hide caption

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CSA Images/ Color Printstock Col/Vetta/Getty Images

Why Your Sense Of Smell Is Better Than You Might Think

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The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says the risks of screening for thyroid cancer in people without symptoms outweigh the benefits. kaisersosa67/Getty Images hide caption

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Don't Screen For Thyroid Cancer, Task Force Says

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Stories of outright misconduct are rare in science. But the pressures on researchers manifest in many more subtle ways, say social scientists studying the problem. Eva Bee/Getty Images hide caption

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How A Budget Squeeze Can Lead To Sloppy Science And Even Cheating

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