Richard Harris Award-winning journalist Richard Harris reports on biomedical research for NPR's newsmagazines, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

A scientist says pen refill reviews on Amazon are more informative that what the current peer review system offers on scientific work costing millions of dollars. Mark Airs/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Aim To Pull Peer Review Out Of The 17th Century

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Rosemary Grant is a registered nurse and helps coordinate sepsis care at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. The center's goal, she says, is to get a patient who might be developing sepsis antibiotics within three hours. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Synergy Between Nurses And Automation Could Be Key To Finding Sepsis Early

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Kristopher Kelly near his home in Concrete, Wash., in February. He broke his pelvis and all his ribs in a work accident last year. The resulting infection he developed in the hospital almost killed him. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Did An IV Cocktail Of Vitamins And Drugs Save This Lumberjack From Sepsis?

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Simone Groper got her flu shot in January at a Walgreens pharmacy in San Francisco. Flu season will likely last a few more weeks, health officials say, and immunization can still minimize your chances of getting seriously sick. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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A doctor and nurse confer inside a room used for flu patients at Northside Hospital in Cumming, Ga. The U.S. government's latest flu report, released Friday, showed flu season continued to intensify, with high volumes of flu-related patient traffic in 42 states, up from 39 the week before. Robert Ray/AP hide caption

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Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect Cancers

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White House Physician Says Trump Is In 'Excellent Health'

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Ben and Tara Stern relax at home in Essex, Md. Ben was diagnosed with glioblastoma in 2016. After conventional treatment failed to stop the tumor, Ben tried an experimental drug. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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For Now, Sequencing Cancer Tumors Holds More Promise Than Proof

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Study participants often answer questions differently, depending on the questioner's gender. Sex hormones can affect results, too. sanjeri/Getty Images hide caption

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A Scientist's Gender Can Skew Research Results

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Teapot Is A Reminder Of The Remarkable 1922 Rose Bowl Game

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Mine Cicek, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic, processes samples for the All of Us program. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Researchers Gather Health Data For 'All Of Us'

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Careful custody of blood tests and tissue samples is essential to the success of precision medicine. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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Precision Medical Treatments Have A Quality Control Problem

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Volunteer Greg Ruegsegger is outfitted with monitors, a catheter threaded into a vein and a mask to capture his breath in an experiment run by Joyner to measure human performance. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Will Gathering Vast Troves of Information Really Lead To Better Health?

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