Richard Harris Award-winning journalist Richard Harris reports on biomedical research for NPR's newsmagazines, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Stories of outright misconduct are rare in science. But the pressures on researchers manifest in many more subtle ways, say social scientists studying the problem. Eva Bee/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Bee/Getty Images

How A Budget Squeeze Can Lead To Sloppy Science And Even Cheating

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The new report from leading U.S. scientists shines a spotlight on how the research enterprise as a whole creates incentives that can be detrimental to good research. Robert Essel NYC/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Essel NYC/Getty Images

Top Scientists Revamp Standards To Foster Integrity In Research

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Sam Rowe for NPR

Drugs That Work In Mice Often Fail When Tried In People

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Seattle Mayor Ed Murray reads a statement to media members Friday, in Seattle. A lawsuit filed Thursday accuses Murray of sexually molesting a teenage high-school dropout in the 1980s. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

A well-regarded intensive care doctor in Virginia says he has had good success in treating 150 sepsis patients with a mix of IV corticosteroids, vitamin C and vitamin B, along with careful management of fluids. Other doctors want more proof — the sort that comes only via more rigorous tests. Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study

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Nearly two-thirds of cell mutations that cause cancer are caused by random error, a study found. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

Cancer Is Partly Caused By Bad Luck, Study Finds

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Of the million or so Americans a year who get sepsis, roughly 300,000 die. Unfortunately, many treatments for the condition have looked promising in small, preliminary studies, only to fail in follow-up research. Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Doctor Turns Up Possible Treatment For Deadly Sepsis

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Sometimes fast-acting chemotherapy can help slow an aggressive cancer — and give the slower-acting immunotherapies a chance to work. UIG Platinum/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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UIG Platinum/UIG via Getty Images

Old-Style Chemo Is Still A Mainstay In The Age Of Targeted Cancer Therapy

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This computer-enhanced barium contrast X-ray shows colon cancer in red. Researchers have been trying to figure out what looks to be a decade-long rise in colon cancer among people younger than 50. Scott Camazine/Science Source hide caption

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Scott Camazine/Science Source

Nancy Roach at a conference in 2016. She's long worked as a patient's advocate and recently teamed up with scientists to help improve the design of studies, as well as to improve clinical care. Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer hide caption

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Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer

Advice From Patients On A Study's Design Makes For Better Science

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Anemic patients did not know about their condition during a testosterone trial. Renphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Renphoto/Getty Images

Researchers Failed To Tell Testosterone Trial Patients They Were Anemic

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Biotechnologist Feng Zhang of the Broad Institute (a joint venture of MIT and Harvard University) was awarded a patent for CRISPR gene-editing technology in 2014. But two other scientists — Jennifer Doudna, of the University of California, Berkeley, and Emmanuelle Charpentier, then of the University of Vienna — published their description of the underlying biology first. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Broad Institute Wins Big Battle Over CRISPR Gene-Editing Patent

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About a quarter of people between the ages of 20 and 69 have some hearing loss, typically from everyday noises like lawn mowers and music. vitranc/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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vitranc/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Think Your Hearing's Great? You Might Want To Check It Out

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